War Memorials, Trumbull Town Hall

Trumbull honors its war veterans as well as the colonial governor for which it is named with monuments in front of Town Hall.

A granite monument on the eastern side of the green in front of Town Hall honors Trumbull’s veterans. A dedication on the front (northwest) face reads, “Dedicated to the honor and sacrifice of the men and women of this community who served our country in all wars, Trumbull, 1958.”

The southeast face lists Trumbull residents lost in wars dating back to the French and Indian War (one name) and continuing through Vietnam (five names). The American Revolution and World War I sections both list one name. The Civil War section lists 16 names, and the World War II section honors 22 residents. (Trumbull’s World War II heroes are also honored with a monument in Beach Memorial Park).

Not far from the war memorial, a boulder monument honors the service of 23 veterans from the Trumbull Center section of town in the First World War (including four from one family, three from another and two from a third family).

On the western side of the green, a 2002 statue honors Jonathan Trumbull, for whom the town was named in 1797. Trumbull, a Lebanon native, served as governor from 1769 to 1784. Trumbull had the unique distinction of being appointed by the British and later being elected by residents of the newly independent state.

The statue, by sculptor John Janvrin Blair, depicts Trumbull holding a Bible in one hand and the Declaration of Independence in the other.

Trumbull, along with Roger Sherman, is one of two Connecticut notables honored in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall collection.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *