Veterans’ Memorial, Farmington

The Veterans’ Memorial in Farmington provides an unusually comprehensive tribute to local residents who participated in wars and skirmishes.

The 1992 monument, in front of Town Hall and near the intersection of Farmington Avenue (Route 4) and Monteith Drive, features five granite columns inscribed with the names of residents who died while serving the nation.

The monument’s front (northwest) face bears the simple inscription “Duty, Honor, Country” and five service branch emblems.

The monument’s columns also list military conflicts starting with early battles including the English settlers’ fights with the Pequots in the 1630s, the French and Indian Wars and the 1712 Defense of Litchfield.

More recent conflicts listed on the monuments include peacekeeping in Lebanon (1982-4), the Grenada invasion in 1983 and Operation Desert Storm in 1990-91).

Looking at major conflicts more typically cited on municipal war memorials, the Farmington monument lists the names of 11 residents killed or wounded in the American Revolution; 63 in the Civil War; eight in World War I; 18 in World War II; and five in Vietnam.

The monument’s southeast face repeats the service emblems, but is otherwise unlettered.

A tree in front of the Veterans’ Memorial is a descendent of Hartford’s Charter Oak.

Farmington’s Civil War, World War I, World War II and Vietnam heroes are also honored with monuments in the town’s Riverside Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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