War Memorial Boulder, Northford

War Memorial Boulder, NorthfordA boulder on Middletown Avenue in the Northford section of North Branford honors local residents who served in the wars between the American Revolution and World War II.

The boulder was first dedicated in 1920, when the bronze plaque on the front (east) face honored veterans of the American Revolution, Civil War and the World War. The monument’s dedication reads “Erected in 1920 by the Society of Northford in honor of her sons who answered their country’s call.”

The American Revolution section lists 50 names. The Civil War section lists 32 names, and the World War Honor Roll lists nine names.

The boulder sits in a small triangular area where Middletown Avenue intersects with Clintonville and Old Post roads. The church uphill from the monument is the Northford Congregational Church.

War Memorial Boulder, NorthfordThe rear side of the monument bears an undated plaque (obviously added after the war) that honors World War II veterans. The plaque lists the names of 78 local residents who served in the war, with stars indicating the names of two residents who were killed in the conflict. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Boulder, Northford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Boulder, Northford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Boulder, Northford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Unknown and African-American Soldier Monuments, Danbury

Unknown Soldiers' Monument, DanburyAn 1894 monument to soldiers and sailors in unknown graves has been joined by a 2007 monument to African-American soldiers in Danbury’s Wooster Cemetery. 

The Monument to Soldiers in Unknown Graves was dedicated in 1894 to honor Connecticut Civil War Veterans who were reported missing after battles. The monument is topped by a granite soldier that, unique among Connecticut Civil War monuments, is holding a rifle at funeral rest position. Also uncommon is the cross at the soldier’s left, on the monument’s south face. (The Connecticut Soldiers’ Monument in St. Bernard’s Cemetery in New Haven also bears a cross on its front face).

The front and back of the monument are inscribed with the names and unit affiliations of local veterans who were lost in the Civil War. 

Unknown Soldiers' Monument, DanburyA bronze plaque has been affixed to the east face of the monument honoring Nathan E. Hickok, who was awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor for capturing a battle flag in 1864 during fighting near Richmond. 

Next to the  Monument to Soldiers in Unknown Graves is a black granite monument that was dedicated in 2007 to honor African-American veterans who volunteered for Civil War service. The front face of the monument bear the dedication “to the memory of the black soldiers of Greater Danbury who served in the 29th and 30th Regiments Conn. Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War 1981-1865.” The front face also bears an inscribed Grand Army of the Republic medal. 

The rear of the monument bears 70 names from the 29th Conn., and honors 16 who were killed in service, as well as nine names from the 30th Conn., including three who were killed. The monument also lists a dozen names from other Connecticut and New York regiments and the U.S. Navy, including one soldier who lost his life. 

Both monuments are not far from the David Wooster monument highlighted in last Friday’s post

Unknown Soldiers' Monument, DanburyA monument to the men of the 29th Regiment Conn. Volunteer Infantry was dedicated in 2008 in New Haven’s Criscuolo Park, and will be highlighted in a future post. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

African-American Soldiers' Monument, Danbury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

African-American Soldiers' Monument, Danbury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Monument, Guilford

Soldiers' Monument, GuilfordA two-toned monument of pink and gray granite honoring Civil War veterans stands at the center of the green in Guilford. 

The monument, featuring an infantryman standing with a rifle in his hands, was completed in two stages that were dedicated 10 years apart. The base, made of pink granite quarried locally, was dedicated in 1877. The soldier, made of gray granite and supplied from a Massachusetts firm, was dedicated in 1887. 

Such a delay in the construction of Civil War monuments, while not common, was not unique to Guilford. The figure atop the Soldiers’ Monument on the Derby Green, for instance, was dedicated six years after the base. 

Soldiers’ Monument, GuilfordThe dedication on the front (south) face of the Guilford monument reads: “In memory of the men of Guilford who fell and in honor of those who served in the war for the Union, the grateful town erects this monument, that their example may speak to coming generations.” The south face also lists the battle of Antietam, as well as the names and regimental affiliations of 14 residents killed in the war. 

The east face lists Gettysburg and an additional 14 names. The north face, which is harder to read, lists Fredericksburg (Va.) and an estimated 15 names. The west face lists Port Royal (S.C.) and 14 names. The first name listed on the west face is Douglas Fowler, a Guilford native who was commanding the 17th Conn. Volunteer Regiment when he was killed in Gettysburg on the first day of the battle (July 1, 1863). 

The gray infantry figure, like many Hollywood starlets, appears to have undergone repairs to his nose at some point during the 121 years he has stood in Guilford. 

On the southwest corner of the green, a boulder bears a bronze plaque dedicated “in honor of our men and women who served in the World War 1917 1918.” The monument also lists the names of about 97 residents who served, as well as four names of residents who gave their lives in the conflict. 

Soldiers’ Monument, GuilfordThe town’s World War II monument, on the southeast corner of the green, features three blocks of pink granite (that also may have been quarried locally). The central block, the largest of the three, honors 16 residents who died in the war by listing their names, ranks and service affiliations. The blocks to the east and west bear bronze plaques describing Guilford’s contributions to the war, including the fact that 500 men and women served in the military as well as the efforts of local farms and businesses. 

The Vietnam war sacrifice of three residents is honored by a 1984 monument on the  northwest corner of the green. That granite monument bears the dedication “Each peaceful dawn in this place we are reminded of these men who died for their country.”

Soldiers’ Monument, GuilfordA tree near the Vietnam monument has been dedicated to the memory of 9/11 victims, and a monument near the northeast corner of the green honors local firefighters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut


9th Regiment Conn. Volunteers Monument, New Haven

9th Regiment Monument, New HavenA 1903 granite monument dedicated to a Civil War regiment comprised primarily of Irish Americans stands in New Haven’s Bay View Park.

The 9th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers monument is located in a park that served as the unit’s training ground and home for a few months following its formation in 1861. A caped infantryman stands with a rifle atop a short granite pillar.

The front (south) face of the monument bears the Connecticut state seal above the name of the regiment and “1861-1865”. The base of the monument also lists the battle of New Orleans.

A bronze plaque on the east face lists nearly 100 names of unit members who died in service as well as the battle of Baton Rouge. The north face lists nearly 80 names and the battle of Cedar Creek (Va.), and the west face lists nearly 85 names as well as Fishers Hill (Va.)

9th Regiment Monument, New HavenThe vintage postcard below shows the monument has undergone several changes since its 1903 dedication. Originally, the monument’s decorative elements were painted gold. Looking closely at the monument, some traces of the gold paint remain. For instance, look at the period (click to enlarge the images) in “Regt.” and the dash between 1861 and 1865.

In addition, the monument was moved from its 1903 location in 1950. Route 1, which runs near the park, was re-routed to accommodate the construction of Interstate 95. This construction in turn prompted changes to the park and the monument, which originally stood at the east end of the park, closer to the harbor (probably on the site of the aquaculture school).

Finally, the four cannons were removed from their carriages and re-mounted on concrete bases. The cannons are original Civil War 12-pounder Dahlgren guns, which were naval cannons known as “boat howitzers” that could be mounted on carriages and brought ashore for land use.

A new monument honoring the 9th Regiment was dedicated in October 2008 at the Vicksburg National Military Park. More information about the regiment’s history and the new monument is available here.

9th Regiment Monument, New Haven

9th Regiment Monument, New Haven

9th Regiment Monument, New Haven

9th Regiment Monument, New Haven

9th Regiment Monument, New Havenvvvvvvv

9th Regiment Monument, New Haven

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Monument, Thomaston

Soldiers' Monument, ThomastonThomaston’s Civil War monument, dedicated in 1902, stands in a small park surrounded by monuments to the two World Wars and the conflicts that followed. 

The Soldiers’ Monument is a multi-layered, square granite shaft topped by a caped infantryman holding a rifle by its barrel. The front (west) side of the shaft bears the dedication “Erected by C.L. Russell Post, No. 68, G.A.R. and citizens, in commemoration of the soldiers who served in the Civil War.” (The G.A.R. refers to the Grand Army of the Republic, the post-Civil War veterans organization.) 

The west face also bears an ornate symbolic eagle in front of two crossed flags, and the battle of Cold Harbor (Va.) is displayed just below the infantryman’s feet.  

The south face commemorates the battle of Gettysburg and features an ornate wreath. The east face honors the battle of Cedar Creek (Va.) and displays the seal of the state of Connecticut. The north face bears a GAR medal and commemorates the battle of Appomattox (Va.), the site of General Lee’s surrender. 

An 1863 cannon stands to the north of the monument, and a later-vintage cannon (perhaps from World War I) stands on the south side of the monument. 

Soliders’ Monument, ThomastonBehind the Civil War monument, a large granite memorial honors veterans from World War II, Korea, Vietnam and in the Persian Gulf. Several bronze plaques list local residents who served in these conflicts, with the World War II monument listing an estimated more than 1,200 names among its five columns. The Korean conflict plaques list more than 165 names, and the Vietnam plaques list an estimated 225 or so names. 

The southwest corner of the park features the World War I Roll of Honor, which was dedicated “by the town of Thomaston to those who served their country in the World War.”

The Roll of Honor monument, which has an iron fence in front of it, also bears a quote from President Woodrow Wilson reading “in a righteous cause they have won immortal glory and have nobly served their nation in serving mankind.”

The monument also features a stylized representation of Liberty standing between a soldier and a sailor, who are surrounded with symbolic flourishes including an airplane, a lighthouse, a cannon and other decorative elements. 

War Memorial, ThomastonBelow these elements is a bronze plaque with four columns of names honoring members of the Army, Navy, Marines and, in an uncommon but rather nice touch, 10 Red Cross and Army nurses.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roll of Honor, Thomaston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roll of Honor, Thomaston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roll of Honor, Thomaston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

Broadway Civil War Monument, New HavenA 32-foot column in a park at the intersections of Elm Street and Broadway in New Haven honors the service of four Connecticut regiments in the Civil War. 

The column, topped by a bronze eagle and flanked by two granite soldiers, was  dedicated on June 16, 1905, to honor three infantry regiments and an artillery regiment. 

A dedication on the front (south) face on the monument reads: “Erected by the joint contributions of the state of Connecticut and the Veteran Associations of 1st Conn. Light Battery and 6th, 7th and 10th Conn. Vols. as a sacred and perpetual memorial to men who suffered and died that the republic might live: 1861-1865.” 

Beneath this dedication, a bronze plaque honors the 10th Conn. Volunteer Infantry, which participated in 51 engagements between Sept. 1861 and Sept. 1865. Among the 1,879 soldiers who enrolled in the regiment, there were 1,011 casualties. The bottom of the plaque bears the inscription “Safe and happy the republic whose sons gladly die in her defense.” 

On the east side of the monument, a figure depicts an infantry soldier reaching into an ammunition bag. On the base beneath his feet, a bronze plaque honors the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers infantry regiment, who participated in battles in South and North Carolina and Georgia, as well as “13 other engagements.” 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New HavenThe west side of the monument features a figure depicting an artilleryman scanning the horizon while holding a ramrod in his left hand. A plaque beneath this figure honors the 1st Conn. Light Battery, which served between Oct. 1861 and June 1865. Major engagements cited on the plaque include the siege of Charleston, and the Richmond and Petersburg campaigns in Virginia.  

A plaque on the south side of the monument commemorates the 6th Conn. Volunteer Infantry, which served between Sept. 1861 and August 1865. The regiment had a total enrollment of 1,608 and suffered 807 casualties during engagements in Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia. 

The vintage postcard below carries a 1909 postmark, and was mailed to Jamaica, New York. The fountain and the reddish street furniture in the foreground have been removed from the park. 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New HavenA booklet commemorating the monument’s dedication ceremonies is available on the Internet Archive. 

The pile of stones in the northwest corner of the park marks the number of military and civilian deaths in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Every month, the number of deaths is painted on a stone that is added to the pile. 

Just north of the  Civil War monument is Christ Church, which was built in 1895. A monument outside the south side of the church is dedicated to George Brinley Morgan, who became pastor of the church in 1878. Rev. Morgan was killed in a motor car accident in 1908, which was likely not yet a common cause of death in that era. 

 

 

 

 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broadway Civil War Monument, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morgan Memorial, Christ Church, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morgan Memorial, Christ Church, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

26th Regiment Volunteer Infantry Monument, Norwich

26th Regiment Monument, NorwichA tall obelisk in the middle of a small Norwich park honors the members of the 26th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, who served in the Civil War in late 1862 and mid-1863.

The monument, dedicated in 1902 in Little Plain Park (between Broadway and Union Street), is a obelisk divided into several sections by ornamental details. A dedication on the monument’s south face reads “To the memory of the 26th Regiment Conn. Volunteer Infantry.”

Just above the dedication, the south face also bears the name “Port Hudson” and a pair of crossed rifles with a wreath, symbolizing the regiment’s service in the infantry. A cross-like symbol appearing on all four sides of the monument is likely a regimental or a corps emblem.

The north face bears some statistics about the unit, listing its original enrollment of 825 members and a breakdown of its 278 casualties: 52 killed in action, 142 wounded and 84 died in service (mostly likely from disease).

26th Regiment Monument, NorwichA regiment comprised primarily of Norwich residents, the 26th’s major engagement was the siege of Port Hudson, La., between May 21 and July 9, 1863. The capture of Port Hudson, together with the capture of Vicksburg, Miss., a few days earlier, gave Union forces effective control of the Mississippi River and provided an important turning point in the Civil War.  

The 26th was organized in Norwich on Nov. 10, 1862, and arrived in New Orleans on Dec. 16. The unit first served at Camp Parapet, a former Confederate fort north of New Orleans that had been captured by Union forces. The unit was shifted to the siege of Port Hudson on May 24, and participated in two ill-fated assaults (on May 27 and June 14) that produced no military benefit for the Union, but did create a large number of casualties. 

When word reached Port Hudson on July 9 that Vicksburg had surrendered to Union forces on July 4, the Confederate leaders at Port Hudson similarly surrendered. 

 

 

26th Regiment Monument, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Wikipedia – Siege of Port Hudson

 

 


Andersonville Memorial, Norwich

Andersonville Memorial, NorwichA large Civil War cannon is featured in a section of Norwich’s Yantic Cemetery is dedicated to veterans including nine residents who died as prisoners of war in the Confederate prison at Andersonville, Ga. 

The nine Norwich veterans who died in the prison were reinterred in Yantic Cemetery on February 1, 1866 after a day of ceremonies that included a parade. The nine graves are arranged in a circular pattern, and several other veterans of the Civil War and later conflicts were added to the area in later years.  

A marker near the cannon  explains that 15 Norwich residents died in Andersonville. Norwich, the first northern city to retrieve its Andersonville dead, sent representatives to the site after the war. Only the 10 who could be identified were returned to their native city. Nine were reburied in Yantic Cemetery, and one was reburied in his family’s plot in the city’s Center Cemetery. 

Andersonville Memorial, NorwichThe cannon (a 4.2 inch, 30-pounder Parrott Rifle manufactured in 1862) has been painted several times over the years, but recently layers of paint were scraped away on the muzzle and barrel to reveal markings by its manufacturer.

Camp Sumter, the Confederate name for the prison constructed in Andersonville, Ga., opened in February 1864 to house Union prisoners of war. The site was enlarged in June of that year, and by August, more than 33,000 prisoners were being confined in a 26.5 acre site largely without shelter or sanitary facilities. Large numbers of prisoners were moved from Andersonville in late 1864 during Sherman’s raids on Georgia, and the population eventually settled down to an average of about 5,000. 

Andersonville Memorial, NorwichBy the end of the war, nearly 13,000 Union soldiers had died from disease, malnutrition and exposure to the elements. 

The site of Camp Sumter has been restored and is maintained by the National Park Service. The site also features the National Prisoner of War Museum and an active National Cemetery.

An “Andersonville Boy” statue honoring Connecticut residents who died in captivity was erected in 1907 on the former prison site. A contingent of 103 prison survivors traveled to Georgia for the dedication ceremonies. A copy of the statue stands on the grounds of the state capitol complex. 

 

Andersonville Memorial, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andersonville Memorial, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Andersonville National Historic Site (National Park Service)

 


The Soldiers’ Monument, Norwich

The Soldiers' Monument, NorwichA large 1875 monument to soldiers killed in the Civil War stands near the northern end of the Chelsea Parade green in Norwich. 

The monument features a caped infantryman standing with two hands wrapped around the barrel of his rifle. Unlike most monuments, in which the figure is gazing straight ahead, the Norwich soldier is looking downward and to his left, making him appear a bit more reflective or contemplative than the average monument figure.

The soldier, unusually large among the state’s Civil War monuments at 12 feet, stands atop an eight-sided column with ornate decorative elements near the top. The front (south) face bears the Connecticut and U.S. shields just below the soldier’s feet. 

The Soldiers' Monument, NorwichFour of the eight columns bear an estimated 160 names and regimental affiliations of local residents who were killed in the war. Unlike many Connecticut Civil War monuments, the Norwich monument does not feature a list of battles in which local residents participated. 

The monument is surrounded by a tasteful iron fence that features four matching granite corners bearing the U.S. shield on the outer faces. At the time of our visit, earlier in March, seven wreaths lay at the base of the monument’s fence. 

Near the south side of the monument’s base, a smaller granite marker indicates a time capsule was buried in 1959 to mark the city’s 300th anniversary. The time capsule is scheduled to be opened 50 years from now in 2059, which in all likelihood means someone besides us will have to report what they find.   

The Soldiers' Monument, NorwichThe vintage postcard image posted below bears a 1908 postmark. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Soldiers' Monument, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Soldiers' Monument, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Soldiers' Monument, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Soldiers' Monument, Norwich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut


Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South Norwalk

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South NorwalkThe Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument in South Norwalk stands in a small park near the intersection of West Washington Street and Martin Luther King Drive. 

The granite monument, dedicated in 1900, depicts a caped infantry soldier, facing southeast, who is holding the barrel of a rifle. He stands atop a round column engraved with a dedication reading “Erected by the Grand Army of the Republic and the citizens of South Norwalk in memory of her loyal sons 1861-1865.” 

The back of the column is stamped with the dedication date of October 20, 1900. The monument sits on a four-sided base, with each face bearing the symbol for a Civil War military specialty: infantry, cavalry, artillery and the navy. 

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South NorwalkShrubbery lines the walkway leading to the monument from Martin Luther King Drive. 

A copper box in the monument has a list naming schoolchildren who contributed to the monument’s fundraising effort. 

(The images for this post were taken in early March, when snow covered a lot of Connecticut.) 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, South Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut