War Memorials, Weatherly, PA

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAWeatherly, Pennsylvania, honors its war heroes and veterans with several monuments.

The most prominent monument on the hillside near the intersection of East Main and Spring streets is the borough’s 1906 Civil War monument. The monument features a standard-bearer holding, in an uncommon pose, an unsheathed sword.

A dedication on the west face of the monument’s granite base reads, “1861-1865. Our country’s crisis. Erected by the citizens of Weatherly and vincinity, A.D. 1906, in memory of its noble defenders.”

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe monument’s east face bears an excerpt from the conclusion of Lincoln’s Gettysburg address reading, “We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

We’re not sure what material was used to create the soldier figure, but our best guess is that was cast in zinc and painted to resemble bronze.

On the hillside in front of the monument, a Rodman gun is flanked by two cannonball pyramids.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe hillside also features three monuments honoring Weatherly’s veterans of the two World Wars, Vietnam, Korea and Desert Storm.

The central monument bears a dedication reading, “Dedicated to the honor and sacrifice of our men and women who served their country. Let none forget they gave their all and faltered not when came the call.”

The monument’s World War I section lists four residents who died during their service, and the World War II section lists 15 names.

The Vietnam memorial lists three residents who died in the conflict and one who was reported missing in action.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAMemorials to the Korean War and Operation Desert Storm do not list any local casualties.

The large school building in the background was donated to the town in 1903 by Bethlehem Steel president Charles M. Schwab and named after his wife, a Weatherly native. The building originally served all grades, and was expanded in 1936. Separate elementary and middle schools were built over the years, and the borough closed the Schwab school after opening a high school in 1990.

 

 

Veterans Memorials, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA

War Memorials, Milford PA

War Memorial, Milford PAMilford, Pennsylvania, honors war veterans and heroes with three monuments in its historic district.

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument on Broad Street (U.S. routes 29 and 6) was dedicated in 1931 and restored in 1991. A bronze plaque on the monument’s front (northwest) face reads, “ Dedicated in honor and memory of the soldiers and sailors from Pike County, Pennsylvania, who answered our country’s call to arms in wars of our nation.”

The monument also features a bronze eagle atop a small globe.

On the other side of Broad Street, the 1874 Pike County courthouse has two memorial plaques on its southeast face. A World War I plaque bears a dedication reading, “To honor those of Pike County who served in the World War.”

War Memorial, Milford PAThe plaque has five columns of names listing county residents, and highlights 15 residents who died during their World War I service.

The courthouse wall also features a 1938 plaque honoring the county’s Civil War veterans. The dedication reads, “In memory of Civil War men who served from Pike Co., Penna.,” and mentions that the plaque was placed by the Gettysburg chapter of the National Society Daughters of the Union 1861-65.”

The plaque contains four columns of names.

Milford is the seat of Pike County, which was formed in 1814. The country was named for Zebulon Pike, who discovered Pike’s Peak and was killed while serving as a general in the War of 1812.

War Memorial, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pike County Courthouse, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Honor Roll, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Honor Roll, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pike Country Courthouse, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Naugatuck

Soldiers' Monument, NaugatuckNaugatuck honors its Civil War veterans with a monument on the town green.

The monument, which we first visited in 2009, was dedicated in 1885. Its east face bears a dedication from the people of Naugatuck “In honor of her sons who fought to maintain the Union 1861-1865.”

The monument in the right background of the top image was dedicated in 1921 to honor Naugatuck’s World War I veterans.

The creche displayed in front of the monument plays Christmas carols.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Naugatuck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Naugatuck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Naugatuck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony CreekWar veterans from the Stony Creek section of Branford are honored with monuments on a small green.

The green, at the intersections of Halls Point, Sachem and Thimble Islands roads, features three monuments made from the pink granite for which Stony Creek is well known.

The central monument features three Honor Roll plaques on its north face. The oldes of the plaques lists the names of 36 World War I veterans and bears a dedication reading, “A tribute to the valor of the men of Stony Creek who entered the service of their country to fight in the great war for world-wide liberty 1917-1919.”

War Memorials, Stony CreekThe World War I memorial is flanked by a plaque listing 26 American Revolution veterans and four veterans of the War of 1812, as well as a plaque listing 10 Civil War veterans and six veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

An undated pink granite Honor Roll monument to the east of the World War I memorial lists two columns of names of local World War II veterans.

A pink granite monument to the west of the World War I monument, dedicated in 1976, honors veterans of Korea and Vietnam.

Isaac Lewis Fountain

War Memorials, Stony CreekA short distance from the war monuments, a memorial fountain honors industrialist and part-time Stony Creek resident Isaac C. Lewis.

The fountain, at the three-way intersection of Indian Point, Thimble Islands and Three Elms roads, features a dedication on its east face reading, “In loving memory of Isaac C. Lewis of Meriden, Conn. The gift of his daughter, Kate A.L. Chapin.”

Isaac Lewis founded a Meriden company that manufactured plated tableware, represented Meriden in the state legislature and served as the city’s mayor.

His Stony Creek house, which stands today, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Guilford

Soldiers' Monument, GuilfordWe first profiled the Soldiers’ Monument on the Guilford green in April of 2009, but last week we noticed that the monument is displaying a wreath for the holiday season.

The base of the monument, made from pink granite that was quarried locally, was dedicated in 1877. The gray granite infantryman, supplied from a Massachusetts firm, was added to the monument 10 years later.

The monument’s south face bears a dedication reading, ““In memory of the men of Guilford who fell and in honor of those who served in the war for the Union, the grateful town erects this monument, that their example may speak to coming generations.”

Soldiers' Monument, GuilfordThe south face also lists 14 residents who died during their Civil War service. The first name on the list is that of Uriah Parmelee, a Guilford native who left Yale during his junior year to serve in the Union Army. Parmelee was killed in April of 1865, and is also honored on the Yale Civil War Memorial in Woolsey Hall.

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Guilford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

Town Hall, New CanaanNew Canaan honors its war veterans with several Honor Roll plaques in the lobby of Town Hall.

On the east wall of the first floor hallway, a plaque honors New Canaan’s veterans of the American Revolution, the Mexican-American War, and the Civil War. The American Revolution sections lists about 130 residents. The Mexican-American War section has two names, and the Civil War section lists about 225 names.

On the west wall, a plaque lists about 260 residents who served in World War I.

Town Hall, New CanaanBoth plaques were dedicated in 1923.

In the front foyer, plaques honor residents who served in World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm.

In front of Town Hall, an English Blakely Rifle has been mounted to honor New Canaan’s Civil War veterans. The cannon bears an undated plaque on its northeast face reading, “Presented to the Samuel P. Ferris Post No. 61 G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) by the Howard M. Bossa Post No. 653 V.F.W. of the U.S.A.”

Samuel P. Ferris was a West Point graduate who served as colonel of the Twenty Eighth Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. The regiment, formed for a nine-month enlistment, recruited 678 men from Litchfield and New Haven counties. The regiment was involved in the capture of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in June of 1863 before mustering out in August of 1863.

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Talcottville

Soldiers' Monument, TalcottvilleA brownstone monument in the Talcottville section of Vernon honors eight local residents who died during Civil War service.

The monument, in Mount Hope Cemetery, was dedicated in 1869 and restored in 2008. The monument stands on a hill near the cemetery’s Elm Hill Road entrance.

The base of the monument’s front (south) face bears a dedication reading, “Erected to the memory of the soldiers from this place who gave their lives to their country in the War Against the Rebellion.”

The south face also honors two Vernon residents who died during in the war. Frank E. Stoughton, who served in the 14th Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, enlisted in July of 1862 and was wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. Stoughton was discharged due to disability in 1865, and died on January 1, 1866.

Soldiers' Monument, TalcottvilleHorace Hunn, who served in the 16th Regiment, was wounded during the Battle of Antietam  and died in a hospital on October 12, 1862. He is buried in the Antietam National Cemetery.

The 16th Regiment was formed in July of 1862 and left for Washington on August 29, 1862. The regiment saw its first action during the Battle of Antietam when the unit, barely trained, fought in the 40-Acre Cornfield.

The 16th sent 779 men into combat, and 43 were killed and 161 were wounded. A monument honoring the regiment was dedicated on the Antietam battlefield in 1894.

Soldiers' Monument, TalcottvilleThe east face of the Talcottville monument honors Philip F. Foster of Vernon, another member of the 16th Regiment killed at Antietam. Like Hunn, Foster is buried in the Antietam National Cemetery.

The east face also honors Henry S. Loomis of Vernon, who drowned in the Potomac on April 24, 1865 (a little over two weeks after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox).

The north face honors two other members of the 16th Regiment: Alonzo Hills, who died as a prisoner of war in Charleston, South Carolina, on October 6, 1864; and James Bushnell, who died in a hospital on November 15, 1862.

Soldiers' Monument, TalcottvilleThe west face honors Orrin O. Brown, who served with the 106th Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infantry. Brown died on April 22, 1863, while serving as part of a garrison protecting the Baltimore and Ohio railroad from Confederate raids in western Virginia.

The west face also honors Frances Bantley, a member of the 6th Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. Bantley died in the Confederate prisoner of war camp at Andersonville, Georgia, and is buried in the National Cemetery there.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Talcottville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonWilton honors its veterans with a group of monuments in a plaza dedicated in 2010.

The Veterans Memorial Green, at the intersection of Center Street and Old Ridgefield Road, features granite columns of honors and benches. The site is dedicated to honor, “Wilton’s fallen heroes who made the supreme sacrifice in America’s wars.”

The collection of monuments includes six granite pillars inscribed with the names of local war heroes. The pillar honoring the French and Indian War, fought between 1754 and 1763, lists 10 residents.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonThe American Revolution column honors 20 residents.

The Civil War has the largest grouping of names, with 34 residents being honored.

The World Wars and Korea share a pillar, with the World War I section listing two names; the World War II section listing 10, and the Korea section listing one.

The Vietnam and Iraq wars also share a pillar, with the Vietnam section honoring eight residents and the Iraq section listing one.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonVeterans Memorial Green, a collaboration between the town and a local American Legion post, was designed by three architects.

 

Nearby Memorials

Wilton veterans are further honored with a monument on the green a short distance south of the Memorial Green site. The memorial, dedicated in 1988, honors all veterans who served in the conflicts between the American Revolution and the Vietnam war.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonHeroes of the World Wars are also honored with a monument in Hillside Cemetery, about a half-mile northwest of the Memorial Green. A marker bears a dedication reading, “In memory of those who gave their lives [in] World Wars I and II,” above 10 names.

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

War Memorials, BurlingtonBurlington honors its war veterans and heroes with several monuments on the green at the intersection of Spielman Highway (Route 4) and George Washington Turnpike.

At the western end of the green, a memorial honors Burlington’s Civil War and World War I veterans. On the western side of the monument, a bronze plaque includes a dedication reading, “The Town of Burlington has not forgotten her beloved brothers who offered their lives  to preserve the Union, 1861-1865.”

Beneath the dedication are 88 names of Burlington residents or natives who served in the Civil War, with stars indicating the 20 residents who died during their Civil War service. The Civil War plaque was dedicated in 1998.

War Memorials, BurlingtonAmong the veterans listed is Elijah W. Bacon, a private in the 14th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor after the Battle of Gettysburg. Bacon captured the 16th North Carolina’s battle flag on the final day of the battle, was killed during the 1864 Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia.

On the east face of the monument, Burlington honors its World War I veterans. The monument’s plaque includes a dedication reading, “Let us hold in honored memory those who served their country in the World War, 1917-1919.”

The World War I monument includes 42 names, and highlights five residents who died during their service.

War Memorials, BurlingtonTo the east of the Civil War and World War I memorial, an undated monument honors Burlington residents who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

The western face of the monument bears an engraved eagle and an inscription reading, “Dedicated to the veterans of Burlington who served in the armed forces and died for our freedom.”

Beneath this dedication, a tablet lists 118 names of residents who served in Vietnam. The tablet further honors two residents who were killed.

The east face of the monument has the same dedication as the west side, and bears two plaques honoring Burlington’s World War II and Korea veterans. The World War II sections list 135 names, and honor seven residents who were killed. The Korea section lists 43 names.

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

War Memorial Park, Waterford

War Memorial Park, WaterfordWaterford honors veterans of the nation’s wars with a collection of monuments in two local parks.

Three monuments are featured in a small green in War Memorial Park on Rope Ferry Road (Route 156), near the intersection with Great Neck Road (Route 213).

A bronze plaque on a 1975 monument honors local residents who served in the American Revolution. The plaque bears a dedication reading, “To honor those patriots from the land now Waterford who courageously responded beginning with the Lexington Alarm in the War of Independence, 1775–1783.”

War Memorial Park, WaterfordThe plaque list nearly 80 names of residents who served in the revolution. At the time, Waterford, incorporated as a town in 1801, was part of New London.

To the west of the American Revolution memorial, a monument honors Waterford’s Civil War and Spanish-American War veterans. The monument’s dedication includes similar language to the American Revolution Memorial, praising the courage of residents who served in the conflicts and including the starting and ending dates of the wars.

The Civil War section of the monument includes nearly 110 names, and the Spanish-American War section lists 10 names.

War Memorial Park, WaterfordA memorial flagpole next to the monument includes the emblems of the military branches in its base.

At the western end of the green, a World War I monument was dedicated in 1928. The dedication plaque contains three columns of names, and highlights five residents who died during their World War service.

Veterans Memorial Green

A little more than a half-mile east of War Memorial Park, Waterford’s veterans are further honored with Veterans Memorial Green on the grounds of Town Hall.

War Memorial Park, WaterfordThe green, at the intersection of Route 156 and Boston Post Road (Route 1), was dedicated in 1997. A granite monument bears an inscription reading, “Dedicated to all the men and women who served in the armed services of the United States of America.” In addition to a engraved eagle, the monument also features bronze service emblems.

The plaza surrounding the memorial, dedicated in 2008, has been designated “a path of honor.” The plaza features memorial bricks inscribed with the names of local veterans.

 

 

War Memorial Park, Waterford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Park, Waterford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Waterford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Waterford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Waterford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Waterford