Category Archives: Korea

Veterans Memorial, Avon

Veterans Memorial, AvonA red granite memorial with several panels honors Avon’s war heroes and veterans.

The central panel of the monument, at the intersection of West Main Street (Routes 44 and 202) and Ensign Drive, honors Avon residents who died during service in the country’s wars. The panel lists one veteran who died during the Mexican War; 25 during the Civil War; 13 from World War II; and two from Vietnam.

Veterans Memorial, AvonThe memorial’s other six panels list veterans of the wars between the Mexican War and the first Persian Gulf War in the early 1990s.

The monument also features a granite podium inscribed with “Dedicated to veterans of all wars,” the name of the local VFW post, and the monument’s dedication dates in 1986 and 1996.

Veterans Memorial, Avon

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Avon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

Wall of Honor, StaffordStafford honors veterans of the nation’s 20th century wars with monuments in a small park on West Main Street.

The Wall of Honor in Stafford’s Olympic Park, dedicated in 2005, features three granite memorials bearing bronze plaques as well as a large World War II cannon.

The central memorial lists the names of six Stafford residents who lost their lives while serving in World War I, as well as the names of 14 residents lost in World War II, and three who died while serving in Korea.

A sign in front of the memorial lists a resident who died while serving in Iraq.

Wall of Honor, StaffordThe central memorial is flanked by two larger granite monuments with bronze plaques listing residents who served in the nation’s wars during the 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.Becket, Massachusetts, honors its war veterans with a collection of monuments in an historic park.

Ballou Park, located at the intersection of Main Street (Route 8) and Prentice Place, features three large monuments honoring the town’s war veterans as well as a number of historic markers.

An undated monument honoring Becket’s World War I veterans bears the names of 35 residents.

A similar monument lists about 78 Becket residents who served in World War II, and denotes three residents who died during their WWII service.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.Becket’s three World War II heroes are further honored with replica headstones located between the two World War memorials.

Another monument honors Becket’s Korea and Vietnam war veterans. The Korea section lists 26 names. The Vietnam section lists 41 names, and highlights one veteran who died during his Vietnam service.

The park, part of the North Becket Historic District, was the former site of the Ballou family homestead and grist mill. The home and mill were destroyed by a flood in 1927, and the site was deeded to the town in 1935 for use as a park.

Historic markers on the site describe nearby buildings, and commemorate the arrival of local railroad service in 1842.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Centerville, Mass.

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.One of the oldest Civil War monuments in Massachusetts stands on a small green in the Centerville section of Barnstable.

The Soldiers’ Monument in Centerville, a granite obelisk dedicated in July of 1866, stands near the intersection of Main Street and Park Avenue, and is one of several veterans’ memorials on the green.

The Civil War monument’s front (north) face lists eight names of of local residents who died during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 47.

The north face also bears a shield bearing the monument’s 1866 dedication date.

The west face bears seven names of Civil War heroes ranging in age from 17 to 45, as well as a decorative trophy featuring crossed swords and an inscription reading, “They died for their country.”

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.The south face bears nine names, ranging in age from 18 to 51, and a shield with an inscription reading, “Erected by the Town of Barnstable.”

The east face lists eight names, ranging from age 16 to 27.

To the north of the Civil War monument, Centerville’s two dozen World War I veterans are honored with a bronze plaque on a boulder that was dedicated in 1927.

Near the southern end of the green, contemporary monuments honor Centerville’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korean War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. Brewster, Massachusetts, honors its local war veterans and heroes with a collection of monuments on Main Street.

The war memorials stand in front of the town’s Council on Aging, a Victorian building on Main Street (Route 6A) that was built in 1893 as Town Hall.

The westernmost of the monuments (on your left as you face the memorials) honors Brewster’s World War I veterans. The monument features a plaque on its south face reading, “Memorial to those who served in the World War. Presented to the Town of Brewster by the Brewster Grange 1919.”

The monument lists the names of 43 residents who served in the conflict, and highlights three who died during their wartime service. Among the dead is Roland C. Nickerson, a member of the prominent Brewster family whose land provided the basis for Roland C. Nickerson State Park.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. To the right of the World War I monument, a bronze plaque on a boulder honors Brewster’s World War II veterans. The monument’s dedication reads, “Proudly we pay tribute to the men and women of Brewster who answered their country’s call in World War II.”

The monument also bears the names of about 120 residents, and honors four who died during the war.

Next to the World War II monument, a smaller memorial honors Brewster residents who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

To the right of the World War II monument, a memorial honors Brewster’s veterans of the Korea and Vietnam wars. The plaque lists 57 veterans.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. At the far right of the memorial collection, a monument honors “veterans from Brewster who served in foreign campaigns.” The memorial doesn’t list any names, but will likely do so in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Cornwall

War Memorials, CornwallThe Cornwall green features monuments honoring the town’s war veterans and a 1989 tornado.

Two granite monuments at the eastern edge of the green, near the corner of Pine Street and Bolton Hill Road, honor veterans of the nation’s 20th Century wars.

The southern monument features bronze Honor Roll plaques listing Cornwall’s World War veterans. The World War I plaque lists about 38 names.

The World War II Honor Roll lists about 110 names, and highlights seven Cornwall residents who died during their World War II service.

War Memorials, CornwallNext to the World Wars memorial, a monument honors Cornwall’s veterans of Korea and Vietnam. The Korea plaque lists about 35 local veterans, and the Vietnam plaque lists about 50 names.

A few steps south of the war memorials, a plaque under a large oak tree proclaims the tree to be a descendent of Hartford’s Charter Oak.

At the western edge of the green, a memorial plaque near a young tree honors “the people and the community spirit that helped Cornwall recover from the July 10, 1989 tornado.” The plaque also lists civic leaders in 1989.

The tornado, one of several to strike Connecticut that day, largely destroyed the old-growth Cathedral Pines forest in Cornwall.

A marker in front of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, near the western edge of the green, designates the location of the Foreign Mission School, which attempted to educate Native American and international missionary students between 1819 and 1826.

World War I Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korea and Vietnam Honor Rolls, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Marker, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Scion, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree Marker, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Weatherly, PA

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAWeatherly, Pennsylvania, honors its war heroes and veterans with several monuments.

The most prominent monument on the hillside near the intersection of East Main and Spring streets is the borough’s 1906 Civil War monument. The monument features a standard-bearer holding, in an uncommon pose, an unsheathed sword.

A dedication on the west face of the monument’s granite base reads, “1861-1865. Our country’s crisis. Erected by the citizens of Weatherly and vincinity, A.D. 1906, in memory of its noble defenders.”

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe monument’s east face bears an excerpt from the conclusion of Lincoln’s Gettysburg address reading, “We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

We’re not sure what material was used to create the soldier figure, but our best guess is that was cast in zinc and painted to resemble bronze.

On the hillside in front of the monument, a Rodman gun is flanked by two cannonball pyramids.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe hillside also features three monuments honoring Weatherly’s veterans of the two World Wars, Vietnam, Korea and Desert Storm.

The central monument bears a dedication reading, “Dedicated to the honor and sacrifice of our men and women who served their country. Let none forget they gave their all and faltered not when came the call.”

The monument’s World War I section lists four residents who died during their service, and the World War II section lists 15 names.

The Vietnam memorial lists three residents who died in the conflict and one who was reported missing in action.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAMemorials to the Korean War and Operation Desert Storm do not list any local casualties.

The large school building in the background was donated to the town in 1903 by Bethlehem Steel president Charles M. Schwab and named after his wife, a Weatherly native. The building originally served all grades, and was expanded in 1936. Separate elementary and middle schools were built over the years, and the borough closed the Schwab school after opening a high school in 1990.

 

 

Veterans Memorials, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA

War Monuments, Washington

World War Monument, WashingtonWashington honors veterans of the 20th century’s major wars with two monuments near its Town Hall.

World War I veterans are honored with a large bronze plaque mounted on a boulder. The plaque bears a dedication reading, “In honor of the Citizens of Washington who served in the World War and in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice.”

The plaque lists five residents who died during the war, and lists the names of 106 other residents who served.

The plaque also contains a brief excerpt from the Ralph Waldo Emerson poem “Voluntaries“:

“So nigh is grandeur to our dust/So near is good to man/When duty whispers low ‘thou must’/The youth replies ‘I can’.”

World War Monument, WashingtonThe poem was written in 1863 to honor young people enlisting in the Civil War, and has been used on a number of war memorials.

Washington’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam are honored with a nearby monument. The monument bears a dedication reading, “The citizens of Washington have not forgotten. In honor and memory of the veterans of the community who served in the armed services of the United States for the cause of liberty.”

The plaque honoring World War II veterans lists 276 names. The Korean War plaque honors 56 veterans, and the Vietnam plaque lists 94 residents who served.

World War Monument, WashingtonThe plaques, near the intersection of Calhoun Street (Route 109) and Bee Brook Road (Route 47), stand in front of Washington’s Bryan Memorial Town Hall. The building was a posthumous donation by Gregory Seeley Bryan. Bryan was a Washington native who owned the Weed Chain Company in Bridgeport, which manufactured tire chains, car jacks and other products.

Bryan died in 1929, and left money for the construction of a municipal building to honor his parents.

 

 

Veterans'  Monument, Washington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans'  Monument, Washington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry

Veterans Memorial Green, CoventryCoventry honors veterans of several wars with monuments on the town’s historic green.

Veterans Memorial Green, along Lake, High and Cross streets, is a former militia ground used for training during the American Revolution, War of 1812 and the Civil War.

Today, the green features six monuments, and ground has been broken for a statue of Nathan Hale that is scheduled for dedication later this year.

Coventry’s World War II veterans are honored with a four-foot granite slab near the green’s northern end. The monument features a large Honor Roll plaque with a dedication reading, “In honor of the men and women of Coventry who served our country in World War II. This memorial was made possible by the citizens of the Town of Coventry.”

Veterans Memorial Green, CoventryThe memorial lists the names of 321 residents who served in World War II and highlights 15 who died during their service.

Coventry’s Korean War monument is a gray granite obelisk that lists the dates of the conflict and includes a dedication “to all who answered our country’s call to duty and those who gave their last full measure of devotion.”

The monument lists one resident who was killed while serving in Korea.

The town’s Vietnam War monument is a blank granite obelisk with a dedication reading, “Coventry remembers the courage, sacrifice and devotion to duty and country of its Vietnam veterans.”

Veterans Memorial Green, CoventryThe monument lists two residents who were killed in action, and two others who died while serving in Vietnam.

Veterans of earlier conflicts are honored with a large memorial boulder that was dedicated in 1928. The boulder bears a plaque that reads, “In grateful memory of those men of Coventry who gave themselves unreservedly in the hour of their country’s need. Among them was Nathan Hale. All might have echoed his immortal words, ‘I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.’

“On this historic military training ground, men assembled in the Colonial Wars, War of the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the Civil War.

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry“This memorial is dedicated by patriotic citizens and friends of Coventry, aided by the societies of the Connecticut Daughters of the American Revolution and Connecticut Sons of the American Revolution.

“The cannon was presented by the government of the United States [in] 1928 during the administration of Calvin Coolidge, AD 1930.”

The cannon referenced on the Memorial Boulder was built in 1896 by the Rock Island Arsenal in Illinois, which today manufactures military tools and combat equipment.

The Coventry Green also features a 1998 memorial to French soldiers who fought for American independence. The monument provides a short summary of the decisive support the French military provided to the Continental Army, and highlights seven French soldiers who died of smallpox and were buried in Coventry in 1781.

Veterans Memorial Green, CoventryThe southern end of Veterans Memorial Green hosts Connecticut’s Vietnam Memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony CreekWar veterans from the Stony Creek section of Branford are honored with monuments on a small green.

The green, at the intersections of Halls Point, Sachem and Thimble Islands roads, features three monuments made from the pink granite for which Stony Creek is well known.

The central monument features three Honor Roll plaques on its north face. The oldes of the plaques lists the names of 36 World War I veterans and bears a dedication reading, “A tribute to the valor of the men of Stony Creek who entered the service of their country to fight in the great war for world-wide liberty 1917-1919.”

War Memorials, Stony CreekThe World War I memorial is flanked by a plaque listing 26 American Revolution veterans and four veterans of the War of 1812, as well as a plaque listing 10 Civil War veterans and six veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

An undated pink granite Honor Roll monument to the east of the World War I memorial lists two columns of names of local World War II veterans.

A pink granite monument to the west of the World War I monument, dedicated in 1976, honors veterans of Korea and Vietnam.

Isaac Lewis Fountain

War Memorials, Stony CreekA short distance from the war monuments, a memorial fountain honors industrialist and part-time Stony Creek resident Isaac C. Lewis.

The fountain, at the three-way intersection of Indian Point, Thimble Islands and Three Elms roads, features a dedication on its east face reading, “In loving memory of Isaac C. Lewis of Meriden, Conn. The gift of his daughter, Kate A.L. Chapin.”

Isaac Lewis founded a Meriden company that manufactured plated tableware, represented Meriden in the state legislature and served as the city’s mayor.

His Stony Creek house, which stands today, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek