World War Monument, Harrison, N.Y.

World War Monument, Harrison, N.Y.The town of Harrison, N.Y.,  honors World War I veterans with a monument topped by a famous Doughboy statue.

The monument, dedicated in 1939, features a version of a Doughboy statue by sculptor E.M. Viquesney that is known formally as the “Spirit of the American Doughboy.” At least 138 other versions of this statue are displayed in the United States, including monuments in North Canaan and Bethel, CT, three monuments in New York and eight in New Jersey.

The Harrison monument stands at the intersection of Harrison Avenue and Heineman Place, in the southwest corner of a park. A plaque on its front (southwest) face reads, “Dedicated to the men and women of the Town of Harrison, New York, who served in the World War.” The plaque also credits the efforts of the local VFW post in erecting the monument.

World War Monument, Harrison, N.Y.The northeast side of the monument has three plaques. The left plaque lists seven residents who were killed in action and 11 who otherwise died in service. The center plaque has five columns of names listing residents who served in the conflict, and the right plaque has three columns of names.

The monument is a later version of its cousin in North Canaan. In 1934, Viquesney switched from the pressed copper or bronze used in the 1920 design to zinc, which was copper-plated to resemble bronze. The tree stumps at the soldier’s feet are shorter, and the “Spirit of the American Doughboy” title is stamped on the front base of the later versions.

The Harrison monument has been cleaned and restored a couple of times in recent years. A bayonet on the soldier’s rifle has been lost over the years.

World War Monument, Harrison, N.Y.The park also features a gazebo that hosted a wedding during our visit, and an elaborate monument at the eastern end honoring local veterans who served in the nation’s wars.

Source: Spirit of the American Doughboy Database

World War Monument, Harrison, N.Y.

War Memorial, Harrison, N.Y.


Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, ClintonA granite infantry soldier stands atop a Civil War monument on Clinton’s Liberty Green.

The monument, dedicated in 1911, features the soldier and a granite base with curved sides that narrows toward the figure. A bronze plaque on the front (south) face reads “Erected by the Woman’s Relief Corps and the citizens of Clinton in memory of the soldiers and sailors who fought to preserve the Union 1861 – 1865 For the dead a tribute, for the living a memory, for posterity an emblem of loyalty to the flag of their country”

Other than the plaque, the monument bears no writing. A state of Connecticut seal appears on the monument’s north face. The figure has growth on his left arm and his right side, along the line between him and his rifle.

The monument is surrounded by a chain supported by four stone pillars, and a cannon used in the War of 1812 stands alongside the monument.

The Woman’s Relief Corps was an auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was also responsible for the Soldiers’ Monument in Putnam. The WRC’s involvement and the relatively late dedication date may reflect the women taking action after waiting 40 years for the town’s male veterans to build a monument.

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, ClintonAbout three-tenths of a mile west along East Main Street (Route 1), a monument in front of Town Hall honors those who served in other wars. The central panel on the front (north) face lists 10 residents who were killed in the two World Wars and Korea. The two side panels list those who served in the World Wars, and the three panels on the monument’s south face lists residents who served in the nation’s other wars.

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

World Wars Memorial, Clinton

World Wars Memorial, Clinton

War Memorials, Easton

World War II/Korea Monument, EastonThe town of Easton honors veterans of the World Wars and Korea with bronze plaques mounted on stone bases in two locations.

Veterans of World War II and Korea are honored with a large monument outside Town Hall on Center Road. A dedication on the front (northwest) face of the undated monument reads “Lest we forget / In memory of the Easton veterans of World War II and Korea.” A larger plaque bears about 212 names, with seven indicating they were killed in one of the conflicts. Both plaques have been mounted on a large, unfinished granite block.

The site is also decorated with two stone planters and a lamppost that’s in danger of being swallowed by the surrounding shrubbery.

World War II/Korea Monument, EastonThe town’s World War I veterans are honored with a large bronze plaque mounted on a boulder along Stepney Road (Route 59). The plaque bears the dedication “Easton remembers the Great War” above three columns listing 34 names of local residents who served in the war. One resident who was killed in the conflict is listed separately under the heading “the fallen.”

The boulder sits outside Union Cemetery, which dates back to the 17th Century. The cemetery is reportedly haunted by a ghost known as “White Lady,” and local police keep a close eye on the grounds to discourage nocturnal ghost-hunting.

World War Monument, Easton

World War Monument, Easton

World War Monument, Easton

World War Monument, North Canaan

World War Monument, North CanaanNorth Canaan honors local veterans and war heroes with a large monument, topped by a Doughboy statue, that was dedicated in 1928.

The monument, at the intersection of East Main Street (Route 44) and Granite Ave.,  features a bench-shaped base comprised of individual stones, rather than the more-common granite base typically seen on war memorials.

A plaque on the front (south) face of the monument bears a dedication “In honor of those who served in the World War from North Canaan,” and lists about 111 names of residents who served, and honors three who were killed. The plaque also depicts combat scenes and bears an eagle and an American Legion logo.

World War Monument, North CanaanThe base of the monument also bears a plaque honoring service in the American Revolution and War of 1812, and a plaque listing about 86 residents who served in the Civil War.

A stone wall matching the appearance of the World War monument’s base was added later. Plaques honor residents who served in Korea, World War II and Vietnam. Trees surrounding the monument also bear plaques honoring residents killed in World War I.

The Doughboy statue, by sculptor E.M. Viquesney, is known formally as the “Spirit of the American Doughboy.” At least 138 other versions of this statue, which can also be seen atop Bethel’s World War monument, are displayed in the United States. The figure was also sold in miniature versions as well as in lamps.

North Canaan originally built the base before deciding later to add the Doughboy statue. A local resident donned his World War I uniform and posed for photos atop the stone base to illustrate how the completed monument would look.

World War Monument, North Canaan

World War Monument, North Canaan

World War Monument, North Canaan

World War Monument, North Canaan

World War Monument, North Canaan

Sources:

Walking the Berkshires

Spirit of the American Doughboy Database

Town Hall War Monuments, Wallingford

War Monuments, WallingfordA collection of three  monuments honoring service in the two World Wars and Korea stand in front of Wallingford’s town hall.

The World War I monument features two large bronze plaques, each with three columns listing local residents who fought in the conflict. The middle panel bears a dedication “in honor and in memory of those men and women of Wallingford who fought in the World War 1917-1918.”

The middle panel also bears a bronze bas relief plaque with marching soldiers and sailors, three of whom are carrying American flags. The monument is stopped with a large bronze eagle.

World War Monument, WallingfordThe town’s World War II monument stands next to the World War I, and features seven plaques, each with three columns of names. The monument is undated, but appears to be of fairly recent vintage. A bronze eagle atop the monument was donated by local veterans’ organizations in 2001.

A separate monument to the Korean War stands near the World War II monument. The Korean War monument has six bronze plaques, also with three columns listing local residents who served in the conflict. The monument also has five round plaques with the emblems of the country’s military service branches.

A separate plaque just below an eagle topping the monument lists the names of six residents killed in the Korean War.

World War Monument, WallingfordWallingford’s construction of a separate Korean War monument is relatively uncommon, with many towns in the state including the Korean and Vietnam wars on a joint memorial.

World War II Monument, Wallingford

World War II Monument, Wallingford

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Middletown

24th CT Volunteers Monument, MiddletownA collection of monuments on Veterans’ Memorial Green along Washington Street in Middletown honors those who served in the Civil War, the two World Wars, Korea and Vietnam.

A 1904 monument near the western end of the green honors the 24th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, a Civil War unit that fought primarily in Louisiana. The monument features a short column flanked by two curved benches and a sphere topped by a bronze eagle. The front (north) face of the monument bears the numeral 24 in a wreath, and lists the battle of Port Hudson. A bronze plaque is inscribed with a dedication “Erected by members of the 24th C.V., citizens of Middletown and [the] state of Connecticut 1904.”

24th CT Volunteers Monument, MiddletownThe west face of the monument lists the battle of Irish Bend. The south face lists the battle of Donaldsonville, and bears a plaque honoring about 75 members of the regiment who were killed in action, had died from wounds, or had died after the war’s conclusion. The east face lists the battle of Baton Rouge.

Further east on the green, a polished black granite monument honors the veterans of the Korean and Vietnam wars. Four large panels bears service emblems and the years of the two conflicts, as well as a dedication “Beyond the far Pacific to the rim of Asia they went – twice in a generation – to risk all for honor and freedom.”

The monument’s rear lists two residents who were killed in Vietnam.

Further east, a tall white obelisk honors 37 soldiers and sailors who died in World War I.  A plaque on the south side lists the names of the war heroes, while a plaque on the west side lists the names of seven battles.

24th CT Volunteers Monument, MiddletownNearby, three polished granite panels honor the service of World War II veterans. The front bears the dedications “Their devotion and sacrifices contributed to final victory” and “Dedicated to the men and women of Middletown who served in the armed forces of their country in time of war.”

The rear bears a bronze plaque with three columns listing residents who were lost in the war.

24th CT Volunteers Monument, Middletown

Korea and Vietnam Memorial, Middletown

Veterans' Memorial Green, Middletown

World War Monument, Middletown

World War II Monument, Middletown

World War II Monument, Middletown


Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World War Monument, Norwalk (Update)

World War Monument, NorwalkOn Sunday afternoon, Norwalk returned an 1878 French cannon to the top of the World War monument on the city’s green.

The cannon, which had been captured by German forces in World War I and recaptured by the French, was presented as a gift to the city of Norwalk in 1921. The cannon stood atop the monument until the monument was moved in 1949 from Belden Avenue to its present home at the intersection of East Avenue and Park Street. At that time, the cannon was shifted to a former VFW building.

The eight bronze plaques bearing the monument’s dedication as well the names of local residents who fought and died in World War I also appear to have been cleaned since we visited the monument in early March (the bottom image in this post was taken then).

World War Monument, NorwalkDuring that visit, we noticed that the plaque on the front face referred to a cannon that clearly was not there. We first assumed the cannon, like many Civil War artillery pieces, had been donated to a World War II scrap metal drive, but were glad to read about plans to restore the cannon to the top of the monument.

Organizers welcomed the restored cannon with a concert by the West Point Band, as well as remarks by a representative of the French government and local officials. 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Norwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Woodbury

Soldiers' Monument, WoodburyAn 1871 obelisk and two cannons on Woodbury’s South Green honor the sacrifice of local residents killed in the Civil War.

The understated design of the monument predates the popularity of adding figures to the tops of Civil War monuments, and the Woodbury monument is similar to obelisks erected in North Branford and Northfield (both of which were dedicated in 1866).

The front (west) face of the monument bears the dedication “in memory of Woodbury soldiers who died in the rebellion of 1861,” as well as the names, ranks and dates of death of eight local residents killed in the conflict. The south face lists 12 names, while the east and north faces both list 13 names.

The front face also bears the seal of the state of Connecticut, and the names on all four faces are surrounded by an ornamental border.

Soldiers' Monument, WoodburyThe monument’s architect, Robert W. Hill, also designed the state armory in Waterbury, the Thomaston Opera House and the Winchester Soldiers’ Monument. 

The cannons, whose markings are difficult to discern, were added to the green well after the monument was dedicated.

Plaques on three boulders north of the Civil War monument honor local residents who served in the World War. Near the tips of the green, a boulder honoring World War I veterans lists the names of 65 men and one woman, and indicates that two men were killed in the conflict.

The World War monument is flanked by two boulders bearing plaques listing the names of men and women who served in World War II, including about a dozen residents who died in the war.

Soldiers' Monument, Woodbury

Soldiers' Monument, Woodbury

World War Monument, Woodbury

World War II Monument, Woodbury

World War I and II monuments, Woodbury

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Monument, Watertown

Soldiers' Monument, WatertownWatertown honors the sacrifice of its Civil War veterans with a 1908 monument rising above DeForest Street (Route 6).

The monument features a round granite column topped by a bronze eagle. The front (southeast) face of the shaft is decorated with three wreaths and two flags rising above the dates of the Civil War. The dedication, carved into granite, reads: “In commemoration of the patriotism and valor of the men of Watertown who, in the hour of peril, offered their lives that the republic might live, thus winning the gratitude of their fellow-citizens, the admiration of succeeding generations and a place among the nation’s heroes; this monument is erected that their example may serve as an inspiration to heroic deeds in all coming time.”

Soldiers' Monument, WatertownThree bronze plaques on the monument base bear about 104 names (some of which are now difficult to discern) and regimental affiliations. One of the units, the 29th, was comprised primarily of African-American volunteers, and the Watertown monument was one of the first in the state to highlight their service (the unit is also honored with a monument in Danbury that was profiled in late April and a monument in New Haven that we haven’t visited yet).

Atop the monument, a bronze eagle sits on a sphere. The column is also topped by decorative ornamentation, as well as United States shields on each of its four faces.

Large evergreens that surrounded the base when the monument was examined by the Connecticut Historical Society have since been replaced by tasteful shrubbery.

Across the street, the town dedicated a monument in 1921 to honor its World War I veterans. The boulder bears two bronze plaques , as well as a plaque commemorating the four local residents killed in Vietnam.

The vintage postcard below does not have a postmark. The view behind the monument has not changed substantially over the years. We tried to duplicate the image, but between Route 6 traffic and unfavorable light, weren’t able to. 

Soldiers' Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Watertown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

Coe Memorial Park, TorringtonSeveral monuments honoring the wartime service of local residents grace Coe Memorial Park in downtown Torrington.

At the north end of the park, near the intersection of Main Street and Litchfield Turnpike, stands the Wolcottville Soldiers’ Monument, which reflects the name of the city during the monument’s dedication in 1879.

The monument, with an uncommon round shaft, features an infantry soldier holding a rifle. The front (north) face includes the Connecticut and United States shields above a dedication “to the defenders of the Union.” The monument’s rear lists the battles of Gettysburg and Antietam, as well as Virginia battles at Winchester, Malvern Hill, Cold Harbor, Petersburgh (sic) and Cedar Creek.

The monument was moved to the park from its former location, in front of city hall, in 1936.

Near the center of the park is a large flagpole with a six-sided base that honors veterans from conflicts including the two World Wars, the American Revolution, the Spanish-American War, Korea, Vietnam, and the Civil War. Veterans of the First World War are listed, while the other wars are honored with more generic descriptions. A plaque also singles out local Italian-American veterans for recognition.

Coe Memorial Park, TorringtonNear the flagpole monument, the local VFW post donated a 155-mm howitzer that looks impressive in the park. The barrel looks poised to cause serious damage to the rest of downtown Torrington.

At the southern end of the park, a large stone fountain honors the service and sacrifice of local Vietnam veterans and heroes.

Coe Memorial Park was donated to the city in 1908 by the children of Lyman Wetmore Coe and his wife, Eliza Seymour Coe. Mr. Coe was the owner of a local brass company, and the park was the site of their homestead. 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coe Memorial Park, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut