Category Archives: World War I

War Memorials, Milford PA

War Memorial, Milford PAMilford, Pennsylvania, honors war veterans and heroes with three monuments in its historic district.

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument on Broad Street (U.S. routes 29 and 6) was dedicated in 1931 and restored in 1991. A bronze plaque on the monument’s front (northwest) face reads, “ Dedicated in honor and memory of the soldiers and sailors from Pike County, Pennsylvania, who answered our country’s call to arms in wars of our nation.”

The monument also features a bronze eagle atop a small globe.

On the other side of Broad Street, the 1874 Pike County courthouse has two memorial plaques on its southeast face. A World War I plaque bears a dedication reading, “To honor those of Pike County who served in the World War.”

War Memorial, Milford PAThe plaque has five columns of names listing county residents, and highlights 15 residents who died during their World War I service.

The courthouse wall also features a 1938 plaque honoring the county’s Civil War veterans. The dedication reads, “In memory of Civil War men who served from Pike Co., Penna.,” and mentions that the plaque was placed by the Gettysburg chapter of the National Society Daughters of the Union 1861-65.”

The plaque contains four columns of names.

Milford is the seat of Pike County, which was formed in 1814. The country was named for Zebulon Pike, who discovered Pike’s Peak and was killed while serving as a general in the War of 1812.

War Memorial, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pike County Courthouse, Milford PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War Honor Roll, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Honor Roll, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pike Country Courthouse, Milford, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yale World War Memorial, New Haven

Hewitt Quadrangle, YaleYale honors students and alumni killed in World War I with a cenotaph dedicated in 1927.

The World War Memorial stands in the Hewitt Quadrangle, an area also known as Beinecke Plaza. A dedication on the monument’s southwest face reads, “In memory of the men of Yale who, true to her traditions, gave their lives that freedom might not perish from the earth.”

The front corners of the sandstone monument’s base feature carved eagles, and the monument also has decorative elements including a tank, a large cannon and a variety of other military equipment.

Yale World War Memorial, New HavenThe names of several World War I battles are inscribed on the Commons dining hall building behind the cenotaph.

The World War memorial was designed by architect Thomas Hastings, who was also responsible for the Commons, Woolsey Hall and the New York Public Library, and Everett V. Meeks, dean of Yale’s School of the Fine Arts.

The names of 225 Yale students and alumni who died during their World War I service are inscribed on panels, dedicated in 1920, along with other memorials in the lobby of Woolsey Hall, including Yale’s Civil War memorial.

In front of the cenotaph, a memorial flagstaff honors Lieutenant Augustus Canfield Ledyard, a Yale alum who was killed in 1899 during the Philippine-American war.

Yale World War Memorial, New HavenThe Ledyard Flagstaff, dedicated in 1908, was moved to its location near the cenotaph as part of a 2004 renovation of the plaza.

 

 

 

 

 

Yale World War Memorial, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yale World War Memorial, New Haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ledyard Flagstaff, Yale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ledyard Flagstaff, Yale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ledyard Flagstaff, Yale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ledyard Flagstaff, Yale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ledyard Flagstaff, Yale

 

War Monuments, Washington

World War Monument, WashingtonWashington honors veterans of the 20th century’s major wars with two monuments near its Town Hall.

World War I veterans are honored with a large bronze plaque mounted on a boulder. The plaque bears a dedication reading, “In honor of the Citizens of Washington who served in the World War and in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice.”

The plaque lists five residents who died during the war, and lists the names of 106 other residents who served.

The plaque also contains a brief excerpt from the Ralph Waldo Emerson poem “Voluntaries“:

“So nigh is grandeur to our dust/So near is good to man/When duty whispers low ‘thou must’/The youth replies ‘I can’.”

World War Monument, WashingtonThe poem was written in 1863 to honor young people enlisting in the Civil War, and has been used on a number of war memorials.

Washington’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam are honored with a nearby monument. The monument bears a dedication reading, “The citizens of Washington have not forgotten. In honor and memory of the veterans of the community who served in the armed services of the United States for the cause of liberty.”

The plaque honoring World War II veterans lists 276 names. The Korean War plaque honors 56 veterans, and the Vietnam plaque lists 94 residents who served.

World War Monument, WashingtonThe plaques, near the intersection of Calhoun Street (Route 109) and Bee Brook Road (Route 47), stand in front of Washington’s Bryan Memorial Town Hall. The building was a posthumous donation by Gregory Seeley Bryan. Bryan was a Washington native who owned the Weed Chain Company in Bridgeport, which manufactured tire chains, car jacks and other products.

Bryan died in 1929, and left money for the construction of a municipal building to honor his parents.

 

 

Veterans'  Monument, Washington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans'  Monument, Washington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Monuments, Oxford

World War I Monument, OxfordOxford honors veterans and heroes of the two World Wars with monuments on Route 67.

Oxford’s undated World War I monument stands near the intersection of Seymour-Southbury Road (Route 67) and Academy Road (Route 42).

The boulder monument includes a bronze plaque listing 39 residents who served in the war and honoring two who died during their service.

The plaque includes a dedication reading, “Erected to honor those from Oxford who served their country in the World War 1917-1919.”

World War I Monument, OxfordA short distance from the World War I monument, Oxford’s World War II heroes are honored with a monument in Victory Memorial Park.

As with the World War I memorial, Oxford’s World War II monument is a simple boulder with a bronze plaque. A dedication on the plaque’s west face reads, “Our hero dead, World War II.”

The plaque lists the names and ranks of 10 residents who died during their World War II service.

The plaque also includes a short prayer reading, “Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them.”

World War I Monument, OxfordThe park (and presumably the monument) was dedicated in 1947.

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony CreekWar veterans from the Stony Creek section of Branford are honored with monuments on a small green.

The green, at the intersections of Halls Point, Sachem and Thimble Islands roads, features three monuments made from the pink granite for which Stony Creek is well known.

The central monument features three Honor Roll plaques on its north face. The oldes of the plaques lists the names of 36 World War I veterans and bears a dedication reading, “A tribute to the valor of the men of Stony Creek who entered the service of their country to fight in the great war for world-wide liberty 1917-1919.”

War Memorials, Stony CreekThe World War I memorial is flanked by a plaque listing 26 American Revolution veterans and four veterans of the War of 1812, as well as a plaque listing 10 Civil War veterans and six veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

An undated pink granite Honor Roll monument to the east of the World War I memorial lists two columns of names of local World War II veterans.

A pink granite monument to the west of the World War I monument, dedicated in 1976, honors veterans of Korea and Vietnam.

Isaac Lewis Fountain

War Memorials, Stony CreekA short distance from the war monuments, a memorial fountain honors industrialist and part-time Stony Creek resident Isaac C. Lewis.

The fountain, at the three-way intersection of Indian Point, Thimble Islands and Three Elms roads, features a dedication on its east face reading, “In loving memory of Isaac C. Lewis of Meriden, Conn. The gift of his daughter, Kate A.L. Chapin.”

Isaac Lewis founded a Meriden company that manufactured plated tableware, represented Meriden in the state legislature and served as the city’s mayor.

His Stony Creek house, which stands today, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

 

 

 

War Memorials, Stony Creek

War Memorials, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Fountain, Stony Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

Town Hall, New CanaanNew Canaan honors its war veterans with several Honor Roll plaques in the lobby of Town Hall.

On the east wall of the first floor hallway, a plaque honors New Canaan’s veterans of the American Revolution, the Mexican-American War, and the Civil War. The American Revolution sections lists about 130 residents. The Mexican-American War section has two names, and the Civil War section lists about 225 names.

On the west wall, a plaque lists about 260 residents who served in World War I.

Town Hall, New CanaanBoth plaques were dedicated in 1923.

In the front foyer, plaques honor residents who served in World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm.

In front of Town Hall, an English Blakely Rifle has been mounted to honor New Canaan’s Civil War veterans. The cannon bears an undated plaque on its northeast face reading, “Presented to the Samuel P. Ferris Post No. 61 G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) by the Howard M. Bossa Post No. 653 V.F.W. of the U.S.A.”

Samuel P. Ferris was a West Point graduate who served as colonel of the Twenty Eighth Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. The regiment, formed for a nine-month enlistment, recruited 678 men from Litchfield and New Haven counties. The regiment was involved in the capture of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in June of 1863 before mustering out in August of 1863.

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town Hall, New Canaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

War Memorial Tower, RockvilleA granite tower in the Rockville section of Vernon honors local veterans of all wars.

The War Memorial Tower, in Rockville’s Henry Park, stands at the summit of Fox Hill. The tower site includes a large plaza with a dedication plaque reading, “Memorial to the Veterans of Our Wars. Constructed by Works Progress Administration. Sponsored by the City of Rockville and the Town of Vernon, Connecticut, 1939.”

Plaques on the tower’s base honor veterans of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps, and bear the symbols of those service branches. We’re guessing the alcoves underneath the plaques once held markers listing local veterans, but could find no reference to when the plaques may have been removed.

War Memorial Tower, RockvilleThe tower was designed by architect Walter B. Chambers, whose works include two buildings on Yale’s Old Campus and a number of New York City buildings, and was modeled after a 1,500-year-old tower in France.

The site offers nice views of downtown Rockville and, on a clear day, as far as Mount Tom and Mount Holyoke. In the center foreground of our picture of the view, you can see Rockville’s 1890 Memorial Building, which was dedicated to honor local Civil War veterans.

Henry Park was donated to Vernon by E. Stevens Henry, a businessman and politician who served as mayor of Rockville, and was also elected to several state offices and the U.S. Congress.

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial Tower, Rockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Monument, Harwinton

Veterans’ Monument, HarwintonHarwinton honors its veterans of the World Wars, Korea and Vietnam with a monument on an historic green.

The undated monument, near the intersection of South Road and Litchfield Road (Route 4), stands near the north end of the green.

The monument is a granite block with an aluminum plaque on its front (north) face that bears an inscription reading, “Dedicated to those who served our country.”

Beneath the dedication, a section dedicated to World War I veterans lists nine names.

Veterans’ Monument, HarwintonA section listing World War II veterans includes 137 names, and honors nine who died during their World War II service.

The monument also lists the names of 37 residents who served in Korea, and 80 who served in Vietnam.

To the northeast of the monument, a 1976 historic marker erected by the town and the Connecticut Historical Commission provides a brief history of Harwinton.

To the east of the monument, the brick building in the left background of some photos is the 1915 Community Hall, which replaced a building erected around 1840. The original building served as Harwinton’s Town Hall and an Episcopal Church.

Veterans’ Monument, HarwintonAt the western edge of the green (part of the Litchfield-South Roads Historic District) stands a 2006 replica of a signpost that has stood, in one form or another, on the location for more than 200 years. In addition to directions and distances to nearby communities, the post was used to display municipal notices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Monument, Harwinton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Monument, Harwinton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signpost, Harwinton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonWilton honors its veterans with a group of monuments in a plaza dedicated in 2010.

The Veterans Memorial Green, at the intersection of Center Street and Old Ridgefield Road, features granite columns of honors and benches. The site is dedicated to honor, “Wilton’s fallen heroes who made the supreme sacrifice in America’s wars.”

The collection of monuments includes six granite pillars inscribed with the names of local war heroes. The pillar honoring the French and Indian War, fought between 1754 and 1763, lists 10 residents.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonThe American Revolution column honors 20 residents.

The Civil War has the largest grouping of names, with 34 residents being honored.

The World Wars and Korea share a pillar, with the World War I section listing two names; the World War II section listing 10, and the Korea section listing one.

The Vietnam and Iraq wars also share a pillar, with the Vietnam section honoring eight residents and the Iraq section listing one.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonVeterans Memorial Green, a collaboration between the town and a local American Legion post, was designed by three architects.

 

Nearby Memorials

Wilton veterans are further honored with a monument on the green a short distance south of the Memorial Green site. The memorial, dedicated in 1988, honors all veterans who served in the conflicts between the American Revolution and the Vietnam war.

Veterans Memorial Green, WiltonHeroes of the World Wars are also honored with a monument in Hillside Cemetery, about a half-mile northwest of the Memorial Green. A marker bears a dedication reading, “In memory of those who gave their lives [in] World Wars I and II,” above 10 names.

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Green, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wars Memorial, Wilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

War Memorials, BurlingtonBurlington honors its war veterans and heroes with several monuments on the green at the intersection of Spielman Highway (Route 4) and George Washington Turnpike.

At the western end of the green, a memorial honors Burlington’s Civil War and World War I veterans. On the western side of the monument, a bronze plaque includes a dedication reading, “The Town of Burlington has not forgotten her beloved brothers who offered their lives  to preserve the Union, 1861-1865.”

Beneath the dedication are 88 names of Burlington residents or natives who served in the Civil War, with stars indicating the 20 residents who died during their Civil War service. The Civil War plaque was dedicated in 1998.

War Memorials, BurlingtonAmong the veterans listed is Elijah W. Bacon, a private in the 14th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor after the Battle of Gettysburg. Bacon captured the 16th North Carolina’s battle flag on the final day of the battle, was killed during the 1864 Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia.

On the east face of the monument, Burlington honors its World War I veterans. The monument’s plaque includes a dedication reading, “Let us hold in honored memory those who served their country in the World War, 1917-1919.”

The World War I monument includes 42 names, and highlights five residents who died during their service.

War Memorials, BurlingtonTo the east of the Civil War and World War I memorial, an undated monument honors Burlington residents who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

The western face of the monument bears an engraved eagle and an inscription reading, “Dedicated to the veterans of Burlington who served in the armed forces and died for our freedom.”

Beneath this dedication, a tablet lists 118 names of residents who served in Vietnam. The tablet further honors two residents who were killed.

The east face of the monument has the same dedication as the west side, and bears two plaques honoring Burlington’s World War II and Korea veterans. The World War II sections list 135 names, and honor seven residents who were killed. The Korea section lists 43 names.

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Burlington