Soldiers’ Memorials, East Haven

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenA large cannon honoring Civil War and American Revolution veterans is one of several war memorials on the East Haven green.

The cannon, a Civil War Rodman Gun, was dedicated in 1911. A plaque on the western face of its base reads, “This tribute to the worth of her sons, who have by land and sea offered their lives in defense of their country, is erected by the citizens of East Haven.”

The western face of the cannon also features a plaque, dedicated in 2002,  listing the names of 16 residents who died in the American Revolution.

The eastern face has a similar plaque listing 15 men killed during the Civil War, including two who died in the Confederate prisoner of war camp in Andersonville, Georgia.

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenThe cannon was one of three originally installed at Fort Nathan Hale in New Haven near the end of the Civil War. During the Spanish-American War, the cannons were moved to Lighthouse Point to help protect New Haven harbor.

After the Spanish-American War, the cannons were donated to East Haven, North Haven and Milford for use as war memorials. The East Haven and North Haven cannon survive, but the Milford Rodman Gun was donated to a World War II scrap metal drive.

The cannon is one of several monuments on East Haven’s green. The northwest corner features a 1988 granite pillar, topped with a globe, that is dedicated to all of East Haven’s veterans.

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenHeroes lost in the two World Wars are listed on plaques mounted on pinkish monuments. The World War I plaque lists five names, while the World War II plaque lists 24 names.

A monument in the southwest corner of the green honors the service of local firefighters.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Memorial, East Haven

World War Memorial, East Haven

World War II Memorial, East Haven

Firefighters’ Memorial, East Haven

World War Memorial Flagpole, New Haven

World War Memorial Flagpole, New HavenA 1928 flagpole in the center of the New Haven Green’s eastern section honors residents lost in the First World War.

The dedication on the east face of the monument’s eight-sided base reads, “In grateful memory of her heroic sons who fell in the service of their country, 1917-1918, the city of New Haven erects this staff, 1928.”

The other seven sides of the flagpole’s base bear bronze plaques that list the names of residents who were killed in the war.

The flagpole’s base also features a bas-relief depiction of allegorical and military figures.

The flagpole is surrounded by a fountain that was added to the site in 2003.

The 16-acre New Haven Green was established in 1638 to provide a common grazing yard for the young colony. The green served as the city’s first burial ground until 1821. British troops camped on the green during their 1779 invasion of New Haven, and the green remains a popular site for public events and political rallies.

World War Memorial Flagpole, New HavenThe southeast corner of the green features the Bennett Memorial Fountain, which was erected in 1907. The fountain was funded  by the will of grocery magnate Philo S. Bennett, who also endowed political sciences prizes at several universities.

World War Memorial Flagpole, New Haven

World War Memorial Flagpole, New Haven

World War Memorial Flagpole, New Haven

World War Memorial Flagpole, New Haven

Soldiers’ Monument, Branford

Soldiers’ Monument, BranfordBranford honors its Civil War veterans with a tall 1885 obelisk on a hilltop between Town Hall and the Congregational Church.

The monument features a standard-bearer standing atop a granite obelisk. A dedication on the front (north) face reads, “Branford, to her brave sons who fought in the war of the rebellion, 1861-1865. One country, one flag.”

The north face also lists the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg, and bears a Grand Army of the Republic emblem with two crossed rifles.

The west face lists the battles of Shiloh and Gettysburg, and the south face lists Vicksburg and Port Huron. The east face lists battles in New Berne, N.C, and Chancellorsville (Va.).

Four United States seals decorate the top of the shaft, just below the standard-bearer’s feet. The Branford monument is similar to the monument in New Haven’s St. Bernard Cemetery, which was produced by the same stonecutter.

A World War I monument on the south side of Branford’s Town Hall features a large representation of the Distinguished Service Cross medal. The monument was designed by local resident J. Andre Smith, and was dedicated in 1923 and restored in 2006.

Soldiers’ Monument, BranfordA granite monument beneath a flagpole in the center of the town green honors residents who were disabled or killed in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. The monument is not dated, but was likely dedicated in the late 1950s or early 1960s.

Soldiers’ Monument, Branford

Soldiers’ Monument, Branford

Soldiers’ Monument, Branford

Soldiers’ Monument, Branford

World War Memorial, Branford

World War II, Korea and Vietnam Monument, Branford

Seaside Village, Bridgeport

Seaside Village, BridgeportA white concrete obelisk in Bridgeport’s Seaside Village honors residents who have served in the country’s wars.

The obelisk, at the southern end of a green located near the center of the village, bears a dedication on its front (south) face reading, “Dedicated in honor of those men & women of Seaside Village who have served their country and community in the Armed Forces.”

In a sense, the entire housing development is a war memorial. Seaside Village was built in 1918, during Bridgeport’s manufacturing heyday,  to provide emergency housing for defense workers. About 257 units, most under 1,000 square feet, were built in a series of small brick buildings designed to resemble a European village.

The street names in Seaside Village are connected to World War I. For instance, Flanders and Alsace streets are named after battlefields. Albert Square, along the village green, is named after King Albert I of Belgium. Cole Street is named after Edward B. Cole, a Marine officer and expert on machine-gun warfare who was killed in France in 1918.

Sims Street is named after William Sims, commander of U.S. Navy forces in Europe during the war, and Burnham Street is named after Frederick Russell Burnham, an American explorer who served in the British Army before the war and would help inspire the international scouting movement.

Seaside Village, BridgeportThe complex was converted to cooperative housing in 1954, and remains an affordable, middle-class complex today. Seaside Village was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

Seaside Village, Bridgeport

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, Stamford

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StamfordThe city of Stamford honors veterans from the Colonial Wars through World War I with a 1920 monument in the heart of downtown.

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, in St. John’s Memorial Park, bears more than 4,400 names of residents on five large bronze plaques.

The monument bears the dedication “In everlasting memory of Stamford’s patriots 1641-1918,” near its top. A peaked roof is topped by a sculpture of three eagles.

The marble monument is based on an ancient Greek monument honoring Lysicrates that also served as inspiration for the 1904 Soldiers’ Monument in Seymour. The Stamford monument features nine columns, and the spaces between the columns honor significant battles in the nation’s various wars.

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StamfordFor example, the American Revolution section, listing the years 1775-1783, honors the battles of Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, Ticonderoga, Trenton, Saratoga, Bennington and Yorktown.

The base of the monument features five large plaques listing the names of residents who served in the nations war. World War I has two plaques of it own, and shares a plaque with the Spanish-American War and the Civil War. A fourth plaque honors veterans of the Civil War, the Mexican War in the 1840s and the War of 1812, and the fifth lists residents who served in the American Revolution as well as  the Colonial and Indian Wars between 1689 and 1763.

The World War I plaques list 26 columns of names, and honor 31 residents killed in the conflict.

The monument underwent an extensive cleaning in the summer of 2009.

A Doughboy statue with a fountain in its base stands near the southeast corner of the small park, which also features benches and walkways emanating from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument.

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StamfordSource: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Stamford

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Stamford

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Stamford

Doughboy Statue, Stamford


Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA 1904 granite monument in Seymour’s French Memorial Park honors the town’s Civil War heroes.

The Soldiers’ Monument, whose design is based on a monument dating back to ancient Athens, features a granite infantry soldier standing atop a domed shaft supported by six pillars.

A dedication on the front (south) face reads, “This monument is erected by the citizens of Seymour in honored memory of the defenders of our country 1861-1865.” Above the open area created by the column, a band lists the battles of Gettysburg, James Island (near Charleston, S.C.), Atlanta and Antietam.

The vintage postcard near the bottom of this post, mailed in October of 1906 to Howard Avenue in Bridgeport, illustrates how the monument has changed over the years. The round fence, for instance, was added later. The monument also featured a tripod formed by three rifles in the area enclosed by the pillars. The rifles belong to the Seymour Historical Society after being stolen and recovered.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourAlso, a cannonball pyramid has been removed since the Connecticut Historical Society surveyed the monument in 1993.

The monument also has three 30-pounder Parrott rifles at the base, similar to those found at nearby Civil War monuments in Derby and Ansonia. The markings on the Seymour cannon are difficult to discern, but at least one was forged in 1864 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

A collection of other war monument stands to the east of the Soldiers’ Monument. Residents who served in the two World Wars are honored by a large monument with four plaques (three of which are dedicated to World War II). The World War I plaque lists four columns of residents who served in the conflict, and honors 13 residents who were killed. Each of the three World War II plaques has four columns of names and collectively honor 31 residents who were killed.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA Vietnam monument has four columns of names and honors two residents who were killed. A Korean War monument has three columns and also honors two residents who were killed. A Revolutionary War monument has two columns of names.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World Wars Memorial, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldLitchfield honors its Civil War heroes with a marble obelisk on the green.

A dedication on the front (south) face of the monument, which was dedicated in 1874, reads, “Pro Patria” (“For one’s country in Latin). The dedication is the centerpiece of an artistic bas relief featuring two weeping soldiers, draped flags, crossed rifles and cannonballs.

The south shaft also features an intricate state of Connecticut seal (the ribbon with the state motto extends beyond the shaft’s edges), four flags and a cross that may symbolize the Army of the Potomac’s Sixth Corps  (which used a squared-off cross as its emblem). The south shaft also lists the battles of Fisher’s Hill and Fort Darling, both in Virginia.

The east face contains the names, regimental affiliation, and the date and place of death of 20 residents lost in the conflict, and lists the battles of Antietam (Md.) and Fort Harrison (Va.)

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldThe north face honors 17 residents killed in the war, and lists the battles of Petersburg and North Anna, both in Virginia.

The west face lists 19 residents, as well as the battles of Winchester and Cold Harbor, both in Virginia.

East of the monument, across South Street, is a boulder with a 1908 plaque honoring the former location of a church in which Lyman Beecher, father of Uncle Tom’s Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe, preached.

To the southwest is a group of three granite memorials with bronze plaques honoring the veterans of Korea, World War II and Vietnam. The Korea monument has four columns listing residents who served. The World War II monument has plaques on its front and rear, both with four columns, that list a total of 17 residents who were lost in the conflict. The Vietnam memorial has four columns of residents who served, and honors one who was killed.

Near these monuments is the town’s World War monument, which lists four columns of residents who served, and indicates nine were killed.

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldA marker south of the Pro Patria monument indicates the site of a recruiting tent for the 19th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. The unit was formed in Litchfield, and deployed to Washington, D.C., in September of 1862 to serve in the garrison defending the capital. In November of 1863, the regiment shifted from the infantry to the artillery, and became the 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The unit participated in the 1864 Battle of Cold Harbor and various 1865 engagements around Petersburg, Va. Of the 2,719 men who served in the unit, 409 were killed, injured or died from disease.

The cannon west of the Pro Patria monument was cast in 1845 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

War Memorials, Litchfield Green

World War Memorial, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Broad Street Memorial Boulevard, Meriden

Broad Street Memorial Boulevard, MeridenMeriden boasts an impressive collection of military monuments along a nearly quarter-mile stretch of Broad Street (Rte. 5).

The largest of the monuments, near the intersection of Broad Street and East Main Street, is the city’s 1930 World War Monument. The monument, by Italian sculptor Aristide Berto Cianfarani, features four figures (representing infantry soldiers, marines, sailors and nurses) at the base of a pointed shaft topped by an allegorical eagle.

An inscription on the western face of the monument’s base reads, “Dedicated to those from Meriden who made the supreme sacrifice in the service of their country during the World War 1917-1918.”

The other faces of the monument’s base list local residents lost in the conflict. Fluting along the column’s shaft and a collection of bronze stars just below the eagle symbolize the United States flag.

World War Monument, MeridenNot far from the monument is Meriden’s World War Wall of Honor, which features six large bronze plaques, each with four columns of names.

Also near the World War monument is the city’s 1955 World War II Honor Roll, which features two granite monuments with three plaques on each side. Each of the 12 plaques has five columns of names, and a small corrections plaque has been attached to one of the monument’s faces.

Moving south along the Broad Street median, we find a Gold Star monument honoring war heroes. The monument features an eagle and four service emblems on its south face, along with the dedication, “To live in the hearts of those we leave is not to die.”

Just across a gap in the median stands the city’s Marine Corps Monument, which was erected in 1976 by local Marines to honor members’ service on the Corps’ 201st anniversary. The U.S. and Marine Corps flags are displayed near the monument.

A bit further south is Meriden’s Spanish-American War monument, which features a rifle-bearing soldier facing east. A plaque on the monument’s east face has three columns listing the names of residents who served in the conflict.

World War Monument, MeridenContinuing south, the next monument honors the service of residents in Korea and Vietnam. A dedication on the east face reads, “In memory of the citizens of Meriden who answered their country’s call.” The left section of the monument lists the 20 residents who fought in Korea, and the right section lists the names of 25 Vietnam veterans.

The last Broad Street monument we’ll look at honors Count Casmir Pulaski, a Polish military commander who emigrated to what would become the United States and became a brigadier general during the American Revolution. Regarded as the father of the American cavalry, Pulaski was killed in 1779 during a siege in Savannah, Ga.

World War Monument, Meriden

World War Monument, Meriden

World War Honor Roll
World War Honor Roll
World War II Honor Roll
World War II Honor Roll
Gold Star Memorial
Gold Star Memorial
Marine Corps Monument
Marine Corps Monument
Spanish-American War Monument
Spanish-American War Monument
Korea-Vietnam Monument
Korea-Vietnam Monument
Casmir Pulaski Monument
Casmir Pulaski Monument

Soldiers Monument, East Hartford

Soldiers' Monument, East HartfordSoldiers Monument, East HartfordEast Hartford honors its Civil War veterans with an 1868 obelisk erected at the highest point of Center Cemetery.

A dedication on the base of the monument’s front (west) face reads, “The Union, it must and shall be preserved.” The west face also bears the U.S. and Connecticut shields, and a decorative element featuring a flag, crossed rifles, a sword and a haversack. The west face also lists Andersonville, the site of a Confederate prison camp in Georgia, and the battle of Cold Harbor (Va.).

Soldiers' Monument, East HartfordAlso on the west face, five residents killed during the war are listed by name, regimental affiliation, the location and date of death, and their age.

The south face lists six residents, Sharpsburg (Md., where the battle of Antietam took place), and Kingston (Ga.) The base bears the dedication, “All honor to the brave.”

Soldiers Monument, East HartfordThe east face lists six residents, the battles of Petersburg and Drury’s Bluff (both in Virginia) and the dedication, “We mourn the patriot dead.”

The north face provides a tangible reminder of the Civil War’s devastating effect on many families and towns. Among the six names listed on the monument, three are from the Flint family: Alvin Flint, who died in  1863 at the age of 58, Alvin Flint, Jr., 17, who was killed in 1862 at Antietam, and George B. Flint, who died in 1864 in Falmouth, Va., at the age of 18.

The north face also lists Antietam and Port Hudson (La.), and a dedication reading, “Erected by voluntary subscription to the memory of the brave men who gave up their lives that the republic might live.”

A short cannon and a stack of cannonballs appear near the northwest corner of the monument. The cannon’s markings are covered by paint.

A deteriorating brownstone eagle was removed from the top of the obelisk in 1996, and replaced with a replica in 2010. (The images without the eagle were taken in 2009.)

Soldiers Monument, East HartfordEast Hartford honors its World War I heroes with a 1929 statue at the corner of a green at the intersection of Central Avenue and Main Street. A dedication on the west face reads,” In honor of the men and women of East Hartford who answered their country’s call to service in the World War. To the dead a tribute, to the living a memory, to posterity a token of loyalty to the flag of their country.

A plaque on the monument’s east face lists 18 residents who gave their lives in the conflict.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers Monument, East Hartford

World War Monument, East Hartford

World War Monument, East Hartford

World War Monument, East Hartford


Standard-Bearer, Glastonbury

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyA 1913 granite Civil War monument anchors an impressive collection of war memorials on the Glastonbury Green.

The Standard-Bearer monument honors Capt. Frederick M. Barber, who served in the 16th Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and other Civil War veterans from Glastonbury. Barber died from wounds suffered during the Battle of Antietam.

A dedication on the front (south) face of the monument reads, “Erected in memory of Capt. Frederick M. Barber and the soldiers of Glastonbury who gave their lives for their country, by Mercy Turner Barber, 1913.”

The east and north faces are blank, but the west face is inscribed with a lengthy dedication reading, “More enduring than this monument will be the memory of their loyal, patriotic devotion to their country. This granite shaft in time will crumble to dust, but the memory of their heroic deeds, the noble sacrifice of their lives, will live in memory’s realm ’till time shall be no more.”

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyAtop the monument, the standard-bearer has the flag cradled in his left arm, with his right hand ready to draw a sword in defense of the flag.

The Standard-Bearer is the largest of six monuments on the green. The western-most monument in the collection honors the service of local residents in World War I with a bronze plaque mounted on a granite base. A dedication atop the plaque reads, “In honor of those of the Town of Glastonbury who answered their country’s call to serve humanity.” The plaque, dedicated in 1924, also bears six columns of names and highlights 16 residents who were killed in the conflict.

To the immediate right of the World War I monument is the granite base of a monument, now blank, that once held a plaque.

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyNext to the blank monument is a granite monument honoring U.S. Air Force Sergeant John Lee Levitow, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for taking actions to save his damaged aircraft during the Vietnam War. A detailed account of his heroic actions appears on a bronze plaque in front of the granite marker.

A monument to the east of the Standard-Bearer monument honors Korean War veterans, including a local Marine who was killed in the conflict.

The eastern-most monument on the green honors World War II veterans with a dedication reading, “A tribute to the men and women who served their country. In honor of these who gave their lives.” The monument, dedicated in 1950, lists 27 residents who were killed in the conflict.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World War Memorial, Glastonbury

Levitow MOH Memorial, Glastonbury

Korea Monument, Glastonbury

World War II Memorial, Glastonbury

Standard-Bearer, Glastonbury