Category Archives: World War II

Veterans Memorial, Avon

Veterans Memorial, AvonA red granite memorial with several panels honors Avon’s war heroes and veterans.

The central panel of the monument, at the intersection of West Main Street (Routes 44 and 202) and Ensign Drive, honors Avon residents who died during service in the country’s wars. The panel lists one veteran who died during the Mexican War; 25 during the Civil War; 13 from World War II; and two from Vietnam.

Veterans Memorial, AvonThe memorial’s other six panels list veterans of the wars between the Mexican War and the first Persian Gulf War in the early 1990s.

The monument also features a granite podium inscribed with “Dedicated to veterans of all wars,” the name of the local VFW post, and the monument’s dedication dates in 1986 and 1996.

Veterans Memorial, Avon

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial, Avon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

Wall of Honor, StaffordStafford honors veterans of the nation’s 20th century wars with monuments in a small park on West Main Street.

The Wall of Honor in Stafford’s Olympic Park, dedicated in 2005, features three granite memorials bearing bronze plaques as well as a large World War II cannon.

The central memorial lists the names of six Stafford residents who lost their lives while serving in World War I, as well as the names of 14 residents lost in World War II, and three who died while serving in Korea.

A sign in front of the memorial lists a resident who died while serving in Iraq.

Wall of Honor, StaffordThe central memorial is flanked by two larger granite monuments with bronze plaques listing residents who served in the nation’s wars during the 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.Hinsdale, Massachusetts, honors its war veterans with a memorial outside the town’s library.

The monument, near the intersection of South Street (Route 8) and Maple Street (Route 143), was dedicated in 1923 and features a Civil War cannon.

A dedication plaque on the northeast face of the monument’s base reads, “This memorial was erected by the Town of Hinsdale and dedicated May 30, 1923. The Civil War tablet and the cannon and balls used in the Civil War, are the gift of Francis E. Warren, soldier and statesman, United States Senator from Wyoming, a native of Hinsdale, award [the] Medal of Honor as follows; ‘Volunteered in response to a call and took part in the movement that was made upon the enemy’s work under a heavy fire therefrom in advance of the general assault.’”

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.A plaque on the southwest face lists Hinsdale’s World War II veterans in four columns.

A plaque on the northwest face honors veterans of the American Revolution, Spanish-American War, World War I, and fighting along the Mexican border in 1916.

A plaque on the southeast face honors Hinsdale’s Civil War veterans.

The cannon was used in the siege and battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana. Warren, who also served as governor of Wyoming, was honored for his actions during that battle and donated the cannon to Hinsdale. A U.S. Air Force missile base in Wyoming is named after Warren.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.The cannon’s carriage was replaced during a restoration of the monument in 2006.

Thanks to Mom and Dad for the images in this post. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.Becket, Massachusetts, honors its war veterans with a collection of monuments in an historic park.

Ballou Park, located at the intersection of Main Street (Route 8) and Prentice Place, features three large monuments honoring the town’s war veterans as well as a number of historic markers.

An undated monument honoring Becket’s World War I veterans bears the names of 35 residents.

A similar monument lists about 78 Becket residents who served in World War II, and denotes three residents who died during their WWII service.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.Becket’s three World War II heroes are further honored with replica headstones located between the two World War memorials.

Another monument honors Becket’s Korea and Vietnam war veterans. The Korea section lists 26 names. The Vietnam section lists 41 names, and highlights one veteran who died during his Vietnam service.

The park, part of the North Becket Historic District, was the former site of the Ballou family homestead and grist mill. The home and mill were destroyed by a flood in 1927, and the site was deeded to the town in 1935 for use as a park.

Historic markers on the site describe nearby buildings, and commemorate the arrival of local railroad service in 1842.

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Centerville, Mass.

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.One of the oldest Civil War monuments in Massachusetts stands on a small green in the Centerville section of Barnstable.

The Soldiers’ Monument in Centerville, a granite obelisk dedicated in July of 1866, stands near the intersection of Main Street and Park Avenue, and is one of several veterans’ memorials on the green.

The Civil War monument’s front (north) face lists eight names of of local residents who died during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 47.

The north face also bears a shield bearing the monument’s 1866 dedication date.

The west face bears seven names of Civil War heroes ranging in age from 17 to 45, as well as a decorative trophy featuring crossed swords and an inscription reading, “They died for their country.”

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.The south face bears nine names, ranging in age from 18 to 51, and a shield with an inscription reading, “Erected by the Town of Barnstable.”

The east face lists eight names, ranging from age 16 to 27.

To the north of the Civil War monument, Centerville’s two dozen World War I veterans are honored with a bronze plaque on a boulder that was dedicated in 1927.

Near the southern end of the green, contemporary monuments honor Centerville’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korean War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. Brewster, Massachusetts, honors its local war veterans and heroes with a collection of monuments on Main Street.

The war memorials stand in front of the town’s Council on Aging, a Victorian building on Main Street (Route 6A) that was built in 1893 as Town Hall.

The westernmost of the monuments (on your left as you face the memorials) honors Brewster’s World War I veterans. The monument features a plaque on its south face reading, “Memorial to those who served in the World War. Presented to the Town of Brewster by the Brewster Grange 1919.”

The monument lists the names of 43 residents who served in the conflict, and highlights three who died during their wartime service. Among the dead is Roland C. Nickerson, a member of the prominent Brewster family whose land provided the basis for Roland C. Nickerson State Park.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. To the right of the World War I monument, a bronze plaque on a boulder honors Brewster’s World War II veterans. The monument’s dedication reads, “Proudly we pay tribute to the men and women of Brewster who answered their country’s call in World War II.”

The monument also bears the names of about 120 residents, and honors four who died during the war.

Next to the World War II monument, a smaller memorial honors Brewster residents who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

To the right of the World War II monument, a memorial honors Brewster’s veterans of the Korea and Vietnam wars. The plaque lists 57 veterans.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. At the far right of the memorial collection, a monument honors “veterans from Brewster who served in foreign campaigns.” The memorial doesn’t list any names, but will likely do so in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

Budleski Memorial Park, YalesvilleThe Yalesville section of Wallingford honors a World War II hero and its World War I veterans with memorials on the village green.

Budleski Memorial Park, at the intersection of Main (CT Route 150) and Chapel streets, was dedicated on May 28, 1944, to honor a local airplane mechanic killed over Germany in 1943.

A plaque at the western end of the green reads, “Budleski Memorial Park. In honor of Stanley P. Budleski, 1st Lt. AAF (Army Air Force), who died in action December 20, 1943. Erected by Yalesville Mens Club, November 11th, 1949.

According to the Connecticut Historical Society, Lt. Budleski enlisted in 1942, and was reported missing in 1943. His death was confirmed the following year.

Budleski Memorial Park, YalesvilleOne of two children of Polish immigrants, Lt. Budleski grew up on his family’s farm a short distance west of the green on Main Street.

He was honored with a parade on the day the green was named in his memory.

A few steps west of the Lt. Budleski marker, a monument honors Yalesville’s World War I veterans.

The monument bears a dedication reading, “In recognition of those who served in the World War, 1914-1919, from the Village of Yalesville.”

The monument, dedicated in 1939 by the Yalesville Mens Club, lists the names of 27 local World War I veterans.

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Cornwall

War Memorials, CornwallThe Cornwall green features monuments honoring the town’s war veterans and a 1989 tornado.

Two granite monuments at the eastern edge of the green, near the corner of Pine Street and Bolton Hill Road, honor veterans of the nation’s 20th Century wars.

The southern monument features bronze Honor Roll plaques listing Cornwall’s World War veterans. The World War I plaque lists about 38 names.

The World War II Honor Roll lists about 110 names, and highlights seven Cornwall residents who died during their World War II service.

War Memorials, CornwallNext to the World Wars memorial, a monument honors Cornwall’s veterans of Korea and Vietnam. The Korea plaque lists about 35 local veterans, and the Vietnam plaque lists about 50 names.

A few steps south of the war memorials, a plaque under a large oak tree proclaims the tree to be a descendent of Hartford’s Charter Oak.

At the western edge of the green, a memorial plaque near a young tree honors “the people and the community spirit that helped Cornwall recover from the July 10, 1989 tornado.” The plaque also lists civic leaders in 1989.

The tornado, one of several to strike Connecticut that day, largely destroyed the old-growth Cathedral Pines forest in Cornwall.

A marker in front of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, near the western edge of the green, designates the location of the Foreign Mission School, which attempted to educate Native American and international missionary students between 1819 and 1826.

World War I Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korea and Vietnam Honor Rolls, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Marker, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Scion, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree Marker, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PA

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PAThe Borough of Jim Thorpe, PA, honors its Civil War veterans with a zinc monument supplied by a Bridgeport, CT, manufacturer.

The Soliders and Sailors Monument, which stands near Packer Hill Road and the Carbon County courthouse, was dedicated in 1886 to honor veterans of the Civil War and earlier conflicts from the borough (then named Mauch Chunk) and nearby communities.

A dedication on the monument’s front (south) face reads, “To the brave defenders of the Union from the County of Carbon.” The battle of Appomattox is also listed on the south face.

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PAThe east face has an excerpt from the Bivouac of the Dead poem by Theodore O’Hara, which appears in several national cemeteries and numerous Civil War monuments (including the Soldiers’ Monument in Derby, CT). The excerpt reads, “On fame’s eternal camping ground their silent tents were spread, and glory guards with solemn round the bivouac of the dead.”

The east face also honors veterans of the 1847 Mexican War.

The north face lists the Civil War battles of the Wilderness, Hampton Roads, Antietam and Gettysburg, as well as the 1815 Battle of New Orleans.

The west face has an inscription reading, “Erected under the auspices of Chapman Post No. 61, G.A.R., 1886.” (The G.A.R. was the Grand Army of the Republic, the post-Civil War veterans’ organization.)

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PAWorld War II

The monument also has an Honor Roll plaque on the base of its south face honoring the county’s World War II veterans. The plaque has eight columns of names, and honors 18 veterans who died during their World War II service.

The monument was rededicated in 1993 after being damaged in a motor vehicle accident.

White Bronze

The Civil War monument was supplied by the Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, CT, which also supplied the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument in Stratford, CT. While there are some differences between the Jim Thorpe and Stratford monuments, such as the standard-bearer in Stratford and some ornamental details, the monuments are very similar.

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PAMonumental Bronze was one of the leading suppliers of a zinc alloy they marketed as “white bronze.”

White bronze headstones can be seen in many older cemeteries, and can be recognized quickly by their distinctive pewter-like color.

Zinc worked pretty well for smaller headstones, but the soft, brittle material created structural problems when it ws used for large Civil War monuments.

The Jim Thorpe monument received extensive work in 1984 to repair corrosion at its base.

 

 

 

 

 

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Honor Roll, Jim Thorpe, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soliders and Sailors Monument, Jim Thorpe, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Weatherly, PA

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAWeatherly, Pennsylvania, honors its war heroes and veterans with several monuments.

The most prominent monument on the hillside near the intersection of East Main and Spring streets is the borough’s 1906 Civil War monument. The monument features a standard-bearer holding, in an uncommon pose, an unsheathed sword.

A dedication on the west face of the monument’s granite base reads, “1861-1865. Our country’s crisis. Erected by the citizens of Weatherly and vincinity, A.D. 1906, in memory of its noble defenders.”

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe monument’s east face bears an excerpt from the conclusion of Lincoln’s Gettysburg address reading, “We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

We’re not sure what material was used to create the soldier figure, but our best guess is that was cast in zinc and painted to resemble bronze.

On the hillside in front of the monument, a Rodman gun is flanked by two cannonball pyramids.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAThe hillside also features three monuments honoring Weatherly’s veterans of the two World Wars, Vietnam, Korea and Desert Storm.

The central monument bears a dedication reading, “Dedicated to the honor and sacrifice of our men and women who served their country. Let none forget they gave their all and faltered not when came the call.”

The monument’s World War I section lists four residents who died during their service, and the World War II section lists 15 names.

The Vietnam memorial lists three residents who died in the conflict and one who was reported missing in action.

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PAMemorials to the Korean War and Operation Desert Storm do not list any local casualties.

The large school building in the background was donated to the town in 1903 by Bethlehem Steel president Charles M. Schwab and named after his wife, a Weatherly native. The building originally served all grades, and was expanded in 1936. Separate elementary and middle schools were built over the years, and the borough closed the Schwab school after opening a high school in 1990.

 

 

Veterans Memorials, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Weatherly, PA