Soldiers’ Memorials, East Haven

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenA large cannon honoring Civil War and American Revolution veterans is one of several war memorials on the East Haven green.

The cannon, a Civil War Rodman Gun, was dedicated in 1911. A plaque on the western face of its base reads, “This tribute to the worth of her sons, who have by land and sea offered their lives in defense of their country, is erected by the citizens of East Haven.”

The western face of the cannon also features a plaque, dedicated in 2002,  listing the names of 16 residents who died in the American Revolution.

The eastern face has a similar plaque listing 15 men killed during the Civil War, including two who died in the Confederate prisoner of war camp in Andersonville, Georgia.

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenThe cannon was one of three originally installed at Fort Nathan Hale in New Haven near the end of the Civil War. During the Spanish-American War, the cannons were moved to Lighthouse Point to help protect New Haven harbor.

After the Spanish-American War, the cannons were donated to East Haven, North Haven and Milford for use as war memorials. The East Haven and North Haven cannon survive, but the Milford Rodman Gun was donated to a World War II scrap metal drive.

The cannon is one of several monuments on East Haven’s green. The northwest corner features a 1988 granite pillar, topped with a globe, that is dedicated to all of East Haven’s veterans.

Soldiers’ Memorial, East HavenHeroes lost in the two World Wars are listed on plaques mounted on pinkish monuments. The World War I plaque lists five names, while the World War II plaque lists 24 names.

A monument in the southwest corner of the green honors the service of local firefighters.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Memorial, East Haven

World War Memorial, East Haven

World War II Memorial, East Haven

Firefighters’ Memorial, East Haven

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, Stratford

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StratfordA 35-foot monument topped by a standard-bearer stands at the highest point of Stratford’s Academy Hill.

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, dedicated in 1889,  is unique in Connecticut because it was cast from zinc, a material that was marketed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as “white bronze.”

A dedication on the front (west) face reads, “Dedicated to the memory of those who fought for liberty and saved the Union.” Below the dedication is a poem whose author is not credited on the monument: “Yet loved ones have fallen, and still where they sleep, a sorrowing nation shall silently weep, and spring’s brightest flowers with gratitude strew o’er those who once cherished the red, white and blue.”

The west side also lists the names of 21 residents killed in the war whose remains weren’t returned to Connecticut, and lists the battles of Gettysburg and Antietam.

The south face has a wooden panel that apparently replaces a decorative zinc panel, and lists the battles of Lookout Mountain (Georgia) and Olustee (Florida).

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StratfordThe east face has a panel reading, “Erected by the Stratford Veteran Association and its friends, October 3rd, 1889. The Union must and shall be preserved,” and lists the battles of Chancellorsville and the Wilderness (both in Virginia).

The north face lists the battles of Fredericksburg (Virginia) and Fort Wagner (South Carolina), and features a decorative panel with an eagle, the U.S. shield, flags, a drum and crossed cannon.

The Stratford standard-bearer is uncommon in that the soldier has a sword in his hand. Most other standard-bearer monuments depict the soldier with his hand on a sheathed sword.

Zinc war monuments are very rare, in part because granite and bronze were more fashionable in the late 19th Century. For example, only one zinc regimental monument (honoring the Fourth Ohio Infantry) was allowed at Gettysburg, in part because veterans didn’t like the appearance of white bronze.

Stratford’s monument, like most white bronze cemetery markers, was produced by the Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport.

P1190522In addition, the material has difficulty supporting its weight when it’s used in large monuments. The Stratford monument has been renovated and reinforced, but remains split at the northwest corner of its base. By sliding a camera into the gap, you can take a photo of an interior structure added in recent years (as well as a large spider web inside the monument).

Near the Civil War monument is Stratford’s Walk of Honor, dedicated in 2005 to honor veterans of World War II and more recent wars. A large archway dedicated to World War II heroes bears the names of 97 residents lost in the conflict.

A Vietnam memorial bears the names of seven residents lost in the conflict. A Korean War monument bears nine names of residents who served, and a separate monument has been dedicated to honor disabled veterans.

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, StratfordThe walkway area is lined with bricks dedicated to local veterans.

A tree northeast of the Soldier’s and Sailors’ monument was planted on October 27, 1958 to mark the 100th anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt’s birth.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Stratford

Walk of Honor, Stratford

Walk of Honor, Stratford

Walk of Honor, Stratford

Walk of Honor, Stratford


Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA 1904 granite monument in Seymour’s French Memorial Park honors the town’s Civil War heroes.

The Soldiers’ Monument, whose design is based on a monument dating back to ancient Athens, features a granite infantry soldier standing atop a domed shaft supported by six pillars.

A dedication on the front (south) face reads, “This monument is erected by the citizens of Seymour in honored memory of the defenders of our country 1861-1865.” Above the open area created by the column, a band lists the battles of Gettysburg, James Island (near Charleston, S.C.), Atlanta and Antietam.

The vintage postcard near the bottom of this post, mailed in October of 1906 to Howard Avenue in Bridgeport, illustrates how the monument has changed over the years. The round fence, for instance, was added later. The monument also featured a tripod formed by three rifles in the area enclosed by the pillars. The rifles belong to the Seymour Historical Society after being stolen and recovered.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourAlso, a cannonball pyramid has been removed since the Connecticut Historical Society surveyed the monument in 1993.

The monument also has three 30-pounder Parrott rifles at the base, similar to those found at nearby Civil War monuments in Derby and Ansonia. The markings on the Seymour cannon are difficult to discern, but at least one was forged in 1864 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

A collection of other war monument stands to the east of the Soldiers’ Monument. Residents who served in the two World Wars are honored by a large monument with four plaques (three of which are dedicated to World War II). The World War I plaque lists four columns of residents who served in the conflict, and honors 13 residents who were killed. Each of the three World War II plaques has four columns of names and collectively honor 31 residents who were killed.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA Vietnam monument has four columns of names and honors two residents who were killed. A Korean War monument has three columns and also honors two residents who were killed. A Revolutionary War monument has two columns of names.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World Wars Memorial, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldLitchfield honors its Civil War heroes with a marble obelisk on the green.

A dedication on the front (south) face of the monument, which was dedicated in 1874, reads, “Pro Patria” (“For one’s country in Latin). The dedication is the centerpiece of an artistic bas relief featuring two weeping soldiers, draped flags, crossed rifles and cannonballs.

The south shaft also features an intricate state of Connecticut seal (the ribbon with the state motto extends beyond the shaft’s edges), four flags and a cross that may symbolize the Army of the Potomac’s Sixth Corps  (which used a squared-off cross as its emblem). The south shaft also lists the battles of Fisher’s Hill and Fort Darling, both in Virginia.

The east face contains the names, regimental affiliation, and the date and place of death of 20 residents lost in the conflict, and lists the battles of Antietam (Md.) and Fort Harrison (Va.)

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldThe north face honors 17 residents killed in the war, and lists the battles of Petersburg and North Anna, both in Virginia.

The west face lists 19 residents, as well as the battles of Winchester and Cold Harbor, both in Virginia.

East of the monument, across South Street, is a boulder with a 1908 plaque honoring the former location of a church in which Lyman Beecher, father of Uncle Tom’s Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe, preached.

To the southwest is a group of three granite memorials with bronze plaques honoring the veterans of Korea, World War II and Vietnam. The Korea monument has four columns listing residents who served. The World War II monument has plaques on its front and rear, both with four columns, that list a total of 17 residents who were lost in the conflict. The Vietnam memorial has four columns of residents who served, and honors one who was killed.

Near these monuments is the town’s World War monument, which lists four columns of residents who served, and indicates nine were killed.

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldA marker south of the Pro Patria monument indicates the site of a recruiting tent for the 19th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. The unit was formed in Litchfield, and deployed to Washington, D.C., in September of 1862 to serve in the garrison defending the capital. In November of 1863, the regiment shifted from the infantry to the artillery, and became the 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The unit participated in the 1864 Battle of Cold Harbor and various 1865 engagements around Petersburg, Va. Of the 2,719 men who served in the unit, 409 were killed, injured or died from disease.

The cannon west of the Pro Patria monument was cast in 1845 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

War Memorials, Litchfield Green

World War Memorial, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Broad Street Memorial Boulevard, Meriden

Broad Street Memorial Boulevard, MeridenMeriden boasts an impressive collection of military monuments along a nearly quarter-mile stretch of Broad Street (Rte. 5).

The largest of the monuments, near the intersection of Broad Street and East Main Street, is the city’s 1930 World War Monument. The monument, by Italian sculptor Aristide Berto Cianfarani, features four figures (representing infantry soldiers, marines, sailors and nurses) at the base of a pointed shaft topped by an allegorical eagle.

An inscription on the western face of the monument’s base reads, “Dedicated to those from Meriden who made the supreme sacrifice in the service of their country during the World War 1917-1918.”

The other faces of the monument’s base list local residents lost in the conflict. Fluting along the column’s shaft and a collection of bronze stars just below the eagle symbolize the United States flag.

World War Monument, MeridenNot far from the monument is Meriden’s World War Wall of Honor, which features six large bronze plaques, each with four columns of names.

Also near the World War monument is the city’s 1955 World War II Honor Roll, which features two granite monuments with three plaques on each side. Each of the 12 plaques has five columns of names, and a small corrections plaque has been attached to one of the monument’s faces.

Moving south along the Broad Street median, we find a Gold Star monument honoring war heroes. The monument features an eagle and four service emblems on its south face, along with the dedication, “To live in the hearts of those we leave is not to die.”

Just across a gap in the median stands the city’s Marine Corps Monument, which was erected in 1976 by local Marines to honor members’ service on the Corps’ 201st anniversary. The U.S. and Marine Corps flags are displayed near the monument.

A bit further south is Meriden’s Spanish-American War monument, which features a rifle-bearing soldier facing east. A plaque on the monument’s east face has three columns listing the names of residents who served in the conflict.

World War Monument, MeridenContinuing south, the next monument honors the service of residents in Korea and Vietnam. A dedication on the east face reads, “In memory of the citizens of Meriden who answered their country’s call.” The left section of the monument lists the 20 residents who fought in Korea, and the right section lists the names of 25 Vietnam veterans.

The last Broad Street monument we’ll look at honors Count Casmir Pulaski, a Polish military commander who emigrated to what would become the United States and became a brigadier general during the American Revolution. Regarded as the father of the American cavalry, Pulaski was killed in 1779 during a siege in Savannah, Ga.

World War Monument, Meriden

World War Monument, Meriden

World War Honor Roll
World War Honor Roll
World War II Honor Roll
World War II Honor Roll
Gold Star Memorial
Gold Star Memorial
Marine Corps Monument
Marine Corps Monument
Spanish-American War Monument
Spanish-American War Monument
Korea-Vietnam Monument
Korea-Vietnam Monument
Casmir Pulaski Monument
Casmir Pulaski Monument

Standard-Bearer, Glastonbury

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyA 1913 granite Civil War monument anchors an impressive collection of war memorials on the Glastonbury Green.

The Standard-Bearer monument honors Capt. Frederick M. Barber, who served in the 16th Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and other Civil War veterans from Glastonbury. Barber died from wounds suffered during the Battle of Antietam.

A dedication on the front (south) face of the monument reads, “Erected in memory of Capt. Frederick M. Barber and the soldiers of Glastonbury who gave their lives for their country, by Mercy Turner Barber, 1913.”

The east and north faces are blank, but the west face is inscribed with a lengthy dedication reading, “More enduring than this monument will be the memory of their loyal, patriotic devotion to their country. This granite shaft in time will crumble to dust, but the memory of their heroic deeds, the noble sacrifice of their lives, will live in memory’s realm ’till time shall be no more.”

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyAtop the monument, the standard-bearer has the flag cradled in his left arm, with his right hand ready to draw a sword in defense of the flag.

The Standard-Bearer is the largest of six monuments on the green. The western-most monument in the collection honors the service of local residents in World War I with a bronze plaque mounted on a granite base. A dedication atop the plaque reads, “In honor of those of the Town of Glastonbury who answered their country’s call to serve humanity.” The plaque, dedicated in 1924, also bears six columns of names and highlights 16 residents who were killed in the conflict.

To the immediate right of the World War I monument is the granite base of a monument, now blank, that once held a plaque.

Standard-Bearer, GlastonburyNext to the blank monument is a granite monument honoring U.S. Air Force Sergeant John Lee Levitow, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for taking actions to save his damaged aircraft during the Vietnam War. A detailed account of his heroic actions appears on a bronze plaque in front of the granite marker.

A monument to the east of the Standard-Bearer monument honors Korean War veterans, including a local Marine who was killed in the conflict.

The eastern-most monument on the green honors World War II veterans with a dedication reading, “A tribute to the men and women who served their country. In honor of these who gave their lives.” The monument, dedicated in 1950, lists 27 residents who were killed in the conflict.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World War Memorial, Glastonbury

Levitow MOH Memorial, Glastonbury

Korea Monument, Glastonbury

World War II Memorial, Glastonbury

Standard-Bearer, Glastonbury


Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, ClintonA granite infantry soldier stands atop a Civil War monument on Clinton’s Liberty Green.

The monument, dedicated in 1911, features the soldier and a granite base with curved sides that narrows toward the figure. A bronze plaque on the front (south) face reads “Erected by the Woman’s Relief Corps and the citizens of Clinton in memory of the soldiers and sailors who fought to preserve the Union 1861 – 1865 For the dead a tribute, for the living a memory, for posterity an emblem of loyalty to the flag of their country”

Other than the plaque, the monument bears no writing. A state of Connecticut seal appears on the monument’s north face. The figure has growth on his left arm and his right side, along the line between him and his rifle.

The monument is surrounded by a chain supported by four stone pillars, and a cannon used in the War of 1812 stands alongside the monument.

The Woman’s Relief Corps was an auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was also responsible for the Soldiers’ Monument in Putnam. The WRC’s involvement and the relatively late dedication date may reflect the women taking action after waiting 40 years for the town’s male veterans to build a monument.

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, ClintonAbout three-tenths of a mile west along East Main Street (Route 1), a monument in front of Town Hall honors those who served in other wars. The central panel on the front (north) face lists 10 residents who were killed in the two World Wars and Korea. The two side panels list those who served in the World Wars, and the three panels on the monument’s south face lists residents who served in the nation’s other wars.

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Clinton

World Wars Memorial, Clinton

World Wars Memorial, Clinton

War Memorials, Easton

World War II/Korea Monument, EastonThe town of Easton honors veterans of the World Wars and Korea with bronze plaques mounted on stone bases in two locations.

Veterans of World War II and Korea are honored with a large monument outside Town Hall on Center Road. A dedication on the front (northwest) face of the undated monument reads “Lest we forget / In memory of the Easton veterans of World War II and Korea.” A larger plaque bears about 212 names, with seven indicating they were killed in one of the conflicts. Both plaques have been mounted on a large, unfinished granite block.

The site is also decorated with two stone planters and a lamppost that’s in danger of being swallowed by the surrounding shrubbery.

World War II/Korea Monument, EastonThe town’s World War I veterans are honored with a large bronze plaque mounted on a boulder along Stepney Road (Route 59). The plaque bears the dedication “Easton remembers the Great War” above three columns listing 34 names of local residents who served in the war. One resident who was killed in the conflict is listed separately under the heading “the fallen.”

The boulder sits outside Union Cemetery, which dates back to the 17th Century. The cemetery is reportedly haunted by a ghost known as “White Lady,” and local police keep a close eye on the grounds to discourage nocturnal ghost-hunting.

World War Monument, Easton

World War Monument, Easton

World War Monument, Easton

National Iwo Jima Memorial, New Britain and Newington

National Iwo Jima MemorialThe more than 6,800 Americans killed in the World War II battle for the island of Iwo Jima are honored at the National Iwo Jima Memorial on the Newington/New Britain border.

The monument, dedicated in 1995 by the Iwo Jima Survivors Association, is similar to the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Va. Both were based on an AP photograph depicting the raising of the American Flag over Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima by five Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman.

The Connecticut monument, which is almost 40 feet high, includes a  bronze statue of the servicemen raising a 48-star flag. Rocks from Mt. Suribachi surround the figures’ feet, and sand from the invasion beach has been incorporated into the monument’s concrete.

National Iwo Jima MemorialThe front (west) face of the monument’s polished granite base lists Connecticut residents killed in the fight for Iwo Jima. The back of the base includes information about the battle, and lists the names of the servicemen depicted in the statue as well as those of the 27 men who received the Medal of Honor for their actions during the nearly month-long battle.

The north and south sides include engraved images from the battle, quotes about its significance and a map of the island.

The monument, visible from Connecticut’s Route 9, also has two granite monument honoring the service of the Medical Corps and military chaplains in the battle. An eternal flame burns from a black granite torch base north of the monument.

National Iwo Jima MemorialThanks to Dad for contributing the images for this post.

National Iwo Jima Memorial

National Iwo Jima Memorial

National Iwo Jima Memorial


Town Hall War Monuments, Wallingford

War Monuments, WallingfordA collection of three  monuments honoring service in the two World Wars and Korea stand in front of Wallingford’s town hall.

The World War I monument features two large bronze plaques, each with three columns listing local residents who fought in the conflict. The middle panel bears a dedication “in honor and in memory of those men and women of Wallingford who fought in the World War 1917-1918.”

The middle panel also bears a bronze bas relief plaque with marching soldiers and sailors, three of whom are carrying American flags. The monument is stopped with a large bronze eagle.

World War Monument, WallingfordThe town’s World War II monument stands next to the World War I, and features seven plaques, each with three columns of names. The monument is undated, but appears to be of fairly recent vintage. A bronze eagle atop the monument was donated by local veterans’ organizations in 2001.

A separate monument to the Korean War stands near the World War II monument. The Korean War monument has six bronze plaques, also with three columns listing local residents who served in the conflict. The monument also has five round plaques with the emblems of the country’s military service branches.

A separate plaque just below an eagle topping the monument lists the names of six residents killed in the Korean War.

World War Monument, WallingfordWallingford’s construction of a separate Korean War monument is relatively uncommon, with many towns in the state including the Korean and Vietnam wars on a joint memorial.

World War II Monument, Wallingford

World War II Monument, Wallingford