Tag Archives: cannon

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA 1904 granite monument in Seymour’s French Memorial Park honors the town’s Civil War heroes.

The Soldiers’ Monument, whose design is based on a monument dating back to ancient Athens, features a granite infantry soldier standing atop a domed shaft supported by six pillars.

A dedication on the front (south) face reads, “This monument is erected by the citizens of Seymour in honored memory of the defenders of our country 1861-1865.” Above the open area created by the column, a band lists the battles of Gettysburg, James Island (near Charleston, S.C.), Atlanta and Antietam.

The vintage postcard near the bottom of this post, mailed in October of 1906 to Howard Avenue in Bridgeport, illustrates how the monument has changed over the years. The round fence, for instance, was added later. The monument also featured a tripod formed by three rifles in the area enclosed by the pillars. The rifles belong to the Seymour Historical Society after being stolen and recovered.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourAlso, a cannonball pyramid has been removed since the Connecticut Historical Society surveyed the monument in 1993.

The monument also has three 30-pounder Parrott rifles at the base, similar to those found at nearby Civil War monuments in Derby and Ansonia. The markings on the Seymour cannon are difficult to discern, but at least one was forged in 1864 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

A collection of other war monument stands to the east of the Soldiers’ Monument. Residents who served in the two World Wars are honored by a large monument with four plaques (three of which are dedicated to World War II). The World War I plaque lists four columns of residents who served in the conflict, and honors 13 residents who were killed. Each of the three World War II plaques has four columns of names and collectively honor 31 residents who were killed.

Soldiers’ Monument, SeymourA Vietnam monument has four columns of names and honors two residents who were killed. A Korean War monument has three columns and also honors two residents who were killed. A Revolutionary War monument has two columns of names.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

World Wars Memorial, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Soldiers’ Monument, Seymour

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldLitchfield honors its Civil War heroes with a marble obelisk on the green.

A dedication on the front (south) face of the monument, which was dedicated in 1874, reads, “Pro Patria” (“For one’s country in Latin). The dedication is the centerpiece of an artistic bas relief featuring two weeping soldiers, draped flags, crossed rifles and cannonballs.

The south shaft also features an intricate state of Connecticut seal (the ribbon with the state motto extends beyond the shaft’s edges), four flags and a cross that may symbolize the Army of the Potomac’s Sixth Corps  (which used a squared-off cross as its emblem). The south shaft also lists the battles of Fisher’s Hill and Fort Darling, both in Virginia.

The east face contains the names, regimental affiliation, and the date and place of death of 20 residents lost in the conflict, and lists the battles of Antietam (Md.) and Fort Harrison (Va.)

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldThe north face honors 17 residents killed in the war, and lists the battles of Petersburg and North Anna, both in Virginia.

The west face lists 19 residents, as well as the battles of Winchester and Cold Harbor, both in Virginia.

East of the monument, across South Street, is a boulder with a 1908 plaque honoring the former location of a church in which Lyman Beecher, father of Uncle Tom’s Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe, preached.

To the southwest is a group of three granite memorials with bronze plaques honoring the veterans of Korea, World War II and Vietnam. The Korea monument has four columns listing residents who served. The World War II monument has plaques on its front and rear, both with four columns, that list a total of 17 residents who were lost in the conflict. The Vietnam memorial has four columns of residents who served, and honors one who was killed.

Near these monuments is the town’s World War monument, which lists four columns of residents who served, and indicates nine were killed.

Pro Patria Monument, LitchfieldA marker south of the Pro Patria monument indicates the site of a recruiting tent for the 19th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. The unit was formed in Litchfield, and deployed to Washington, D.C., in September of 1862 to serve in the garrison defending the capital. In November of 1863, the regiment shifted from the infantry to the artillery, and became the 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The unit participated in the 1864 Battle of Cold Harbor and various 1865 engagements around Petersburg, Va. Of the 2,719 men who served in the unit, 409 were killed, injured or died from disease.

The cannon west of the Pro Patria monument was cast in 1845 by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, N.Y.

Source: Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

War Memorials, Litchfield Green

World War Memorial, Litchfield

Pro Patria Monument, Litchfield

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, Danielson

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, DanielsonAn 1878 monument at the northeast corner of a park in the Danielson section of Killingly honors the service of local residents in the Civil War.

The somewhat understated Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument features a bronze infantry solider standing atop a four-sided granite base. The front (northeast) face of the monument bears the dedication “Erected AD 1878 by the Women’s Monument Association and Town of Killingly  in honor of the soldiers and sailors who served in the war of 1861 for the preservation of the Union.”

The front also bears the Connecticut seal, and the top of the granite base has a small facade adorned with ivy leaves.

The rear side of the monument bears the U.S. shield emblem, and the left and right sides display ornamental wreaths.

Unlike many Civil War monuments in the state, the Danielson monument does not list individual soldiers lost in the war or major battles in which area residents or regiments fought.

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, DanielsonA 30-pounder Parrott rifle cannon has been mounted in front of the monument. The cannon bears an 1862 manufacturing date stamp, as well as the initials of the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York.  A cannonball pyramid originally stood in front of the cannon, but has since been removed (most likely during a wartime scrap metal drive).

Davis Park also has monuments honoring local residents who fought in the World Wars and Desert Storm. The World War monument, near the southwest corner of the park, is a large boulder topped with a bronze eagle. A plaque on the front face bears four columns listing local residents who served in the conflict, with a section beneath the dedication honoring two residents who were killed.

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, DanielsonKillingly’s World War II monument features a granite slab flanked by two square columns. A plaque on the central slab list 34 Killingly residents killed in the conflict.

The park’s Desert Storm monument lists 49 men and women who served in the conflict, and one who was killed.

Davis Park was donated to Killingly in 1893 by Edwin W. Davis, a Danielson native who founded retail stores and banks in Iowa and Colorado. He requested the new park be named for his parents.

World War Monument, Danielson

World War II Monument, Danielson

World War II Monument, Danielson

Desert Storm Monument, Danielson

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut