Tag Archives: Coventry

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, Coventry

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, CoventryThe Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, on Coventry’s Veterans’ Memorial Green, was dedicated in May of 2008 to honor the 612 state residents who died during the Vietnam War.

The memorial, near the intersection of Lake and Cross streets, features four black granite panels, with the center two panels listing the names of the state’s Vietnam heroes.

The center panels also bear a dedication reading, “All gave some, some gave all.”

The memorial’s base bears bronze service emblems from the various military branches.

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, CoventryEfforts to build the monument began in 2001, when students at Coventry’s Nathan Hale Middle School began a project to compile biographical information about Connecticut veterans who died in the war.

The middle school project inspired local efforts to build a permanent memorial to the war heroes, and the town of Coventry agreed to provide land on the Memorial Green.

Students at Coventry High School are collecting photographs of the state’s Vietnam heroes as part of the “Call for Photos” campaign being coordinated by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund.

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, CoventryThe photos will be part of an interactive display in an education center planned for Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Vietnam Memorial, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

Civil War Monument, CoventryCoventry honors its Civil War veterans with a simple monument in Nathan Hale Cemetery.

The undated Civil War monument, near the monument honoring Hale, features a 30-pounder Parrott Rifle mounted on a granite base.

A dedication on the east face of the monument’s base reads, “Veterans, 1861-1865.”

Next to the cannon is a triangular metal bracket that once held a pyramid of shells for the cannon. The fate of the shells is not recorded, but many Civil War cannonballs and shells were removed from monuments during World War II and donated to scrap metal drives.

Civil War Monument, CoventryThe Coventry Parrott Rifle was forged in 1862 at the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York. Similar cannon from the foundry can be seen near monuments in Derby, Ansonia and other Connecticut towns.

The town of Coventry’s Veterans Memorial Commission hopes to restore the appearance of the rusted cannon and to replace its existing base.

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathan Hale Monument, Coventry

Nathan Hale Monument, CoventryNathan Hale is honored in his hometown of Coventry with a large monument in a cemetery that also bears his name.

The 1846 monument, near the entrance to Nathan Hale Cemetery on Lake Street, is a 45-foot-tall granite obelisk with Egyptian-themed decorative elements.

A dedication on the monument’s east face reads, “Captain Nathan Hale, 1776.” The north face has an inscription reading, “Born at Coventry, June 6, 1755.”

The west face displays the famous quotation cited as Hale’s final words: “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.”

Nathan Hale Monument, CoventryThe south face reads, “Died at New York, Sept. 22, 1776.”

The monument was designed by New Haven architect Henry Austin. At the time of its dedication, some criticized the monument for being large and immodest.

Fundraising for the monument began in 1837, and the monument was dedicated in 1846. The monument was restored in 1890s, and in 1923, the monument was transferred to the State of Connecticut.

A wayside marker near the monument provides information about Hale’s life and the cemetery.

Nathan Hale Monument, CoventryHale, a Coventry native and Yale graduate, taught in East Haddam and New London before volunteering to serve as a spy in New York in 1776. Hale was captured and hanged by the British, and his body was buried in an unrecorded location.

Hale, designated as Connecticut’s official hero in 1985, is honored with statues in New London’s Williams Park, the Yale campus, the state capitol, New Haven’s Fort Nathan Hale, and with a bust in East Haddam. His Coventry home is maintained as a museum.

The town of Coventry plans to dedicate a statue of Hale next year as part of celebrations commemorating the 300th anniversary of the town’s founding.

 

 

 

 

Nathan Hale Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathan Hale Monument, Coventry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathan Hale Monument, Coventry