Tag Archives: Massachusetts

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, Massachusetts

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsA monument to Abraham Lincoln in Hingham, Mass., honors an ancestral connection between the president and the town.

Lincoln’s early relatives, including his great-great-great-great grandfather Samuel, were among the English settlers of Hingham.

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsThe Lincoln statue, on a green near Samuel Lincoln’s home on Lincoln Street, was dedicated in 1939. The south face of the monument’s base bears an inscription with the “With malice toward none, with charity for all” excerpt from Lincoln’s second inaugural address in 1865.

The north face bears a dedication to the family of Everett Whitney, a local lumber dealer who funded with statue with a $30,000 donation (more than $492,000 in today’s dollars) bequest.

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsThe sculpture was created by Charles Keck,  whose other works include a Harry S. Truman bust in the U.S. Capitol, the Father Francis P. Duffy statue in New York’s Time Square, the bronze USS Maine plaque that was mounted in nearly 1,000 locations and numerous other works.

A memorial near the north end of the green honors Benjamin Lincoln, another descendent of Hingham’s settlers. Benjamin Lincoln served as a major general during the American Revolution, and accepted the British surrender at Yorktown. He also served as the first secretary of war of the United States.

Samuel Lincoln Home, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Lincoln Memorial, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Lincoln Memorial, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.Hinsdale, Massachusetts, honors its war veterans with a memorial outside the town’s library.

The monument, near the intersection of South Street (Route 8) and Maple Street (Route 143), was dedicated in 1923 and features a Civil War cannon.

A dedication plaque on the northeast face of the monument’s base reads, “This memorial was erected by the Town of Hinsdale and dedicated May 30, 1923. The Civil War tablet and the cannon and balls used in the Civil War, are the gift of Francis E. Warren, soldier and statesman, United States Senator from Wyoming, a native of Hinsdale, award [the] Medal of Honor as follows; ‘Volunteered in response to a call and took part in the movement that was made upon the enemy’s work under a heavy fire therefrom in advance of the general assault.’”

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.A plaque on the southwest face lists Hinsdale’s World War II veterans in four columns.

A plaque on the northwest face honors veterans of the American Revolution, Spanish-American War, World War I, and fighting along the Mexican border in 1916.

A plaque on the southeast face honors Hinsdale’s Civil War veterans.

The cannon was used in the siege and battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana. Warren, who also served as governor of Wyoming, was honored for his actions during that battle and donated the cannon to Hinsdale. A U.S. Air Force missile base in Wyoming is named after Warren.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.The cannon’s carriage was replaced during a restoration of the monument in 2006.

Thanks to Mom and Dad for the images in this post. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.A stone cairn in western Massachusetts honors the construction of a local road that bypassed a dangerous hill.

The Monument to the Automobile Age in Becket, Mass., was dedicated in 1910 to mark the opening of a bypass road that helped early motorists avoid the dangerous Jacob’s Ladder hill. Stones bearing the names of towns from throughout the northeast and eastern New York were added to the cairn, which stands today near the intersection of Route 20 and Johnson Road.

A 2010 stone on the upper left side of the cairn highlights the 100th anniversary of the opening of the bypass, and a wayside marker to the right of the cairn provides a brief history.

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.In the 1930s, the loose cairn was moved across the road. The cairn was shifted again in 1946, and its stones were cemented in place.

Historic images on the wayside marker indicate several stones were placed in new positions. For instance, the green plaque with three names on the left side was originally in the center of the cairn, and the eagle plaque was shifted from the middle to the lower right.

The cairn has apparently been a popular graffiti target, and a number of loose stones at the site bear the names and hometowns of recent visitors.

A cement deer stands a short distance to the west of the cairn, near the corner of Johnson Road. Because, hey, why not? If you’re going to have a large cairn on your road, you may as well add a cement deer.

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Near the Monument to the Automobile Age, Becket, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Centerville, Mass.

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.One of the oldest Civil War monuments in Massachusetts stands on a small green in the Centerville section of Barnstable.

The Soldiers’ Monument in Centerville, a granite obelisk dedicated in July of 1866, stands near the intersection of Main Street and Park Avenue, and is one of several veterans’ memorials on the green.

The Civil War monument’s front (north) face lists eight names of of local residents who died during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 47.

The north face also bears a shield bearing the monument’s 1866 dedication date.

The west face bears seven names of Civil War heroes ranging in age from 17 to 45, as well as a decorative trophy featuring crossed swords and an inscription reading, “They died for their country.”

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.The south face bears nine names, ranging in age from 18 to 51, and a shield with an inscription reading, “Erected by the Town of Barnstable.”

The east face lists eight names, ranging from age 16 to 27.

To the north of the Civil War monument, Centerville’s two dozen World War I veterans are honored with a bronze plaque on a boulder that was dedicated in 1927.

Near the southern end of the green, contemporary monuments honor Centerville’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korean War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. Brewster, Massachusetts, honors its local war veterans and heroes with a collection of monuments on Main Street.

The war memorials stand in front of the town’s Council on Aging, a Victorian building on Main Street (Route 6A) that was built in 1893 as Town Hall.

The westernmost of the monuments (on your left as you face the memorials) honors Brewster’s World War I veterans. The monument features a plaque on its south face reading, “Memorial to those who served in the World War. Presented to the Town of Brewster by the Brewster Grange 1919.”

The monument lists the names of 43 residents who served in the conflict, and highlights three who died during their wartime service. Among the dead is Roland C. Nickerson, a member of the prominent Brewster family whose land provided the basis for Roland C. Nickerson State Park.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. To the right of the World War I monument, a bronze plaque on a boulder honors Brewster’s World War II veterans. The monument’s dedication reads, “Proudly we pay tribute to the men and women of Brewster who answered their country’s call in World War II.”

The monument also bears the names of about 120 residents, and honors four who died during the war.

Next to the World War II monument, a smaller memorial honors Brewster residents who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

To the right of the World War II monument, a memorial honors Brewster’s veterans of the Korea and Vietnam wars. The plaque lists 57 veterans.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. At the far right of the memorial collection, a monument honors “veterans from Brewster who served in foreign campaigns.” The memorial doesn’t list any names, but will likely do so in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.Chatham, Massachusetts, honors its Civil War heroes with a marble monument on a Main Street green.

The marble obelisk, on a green near the triangular intersection of Main and Seaview streets, bears a dedication on its southwest face reading, “Erected by the town of Chatham in memory of those that fell in the Rebellion of 1861 to 1865.”

The southwest face also bears a decorative trophy depicting crossed rifles and flags.

The southeast face lists the name, affiliation, ages and details about the wounding and death of six local veterans who perished during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 36, and the listing for Benjamin F. Bassett appears to have a correction for his age (an uncommon occurrence for a marble war monument).

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.The northwest face lists seven names of war heroes who ranged in age from 18 to 56.

The monument has been attributed to sculptor James H. Jenks.

The monument is not dated, but its similarity to other monuments from the late 1860s (including the 1865 Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Wellfleet) would suggest the Chatham monument was dedicated during that general period.

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.Wellfleet, Massachusetts, honors its Civil War veterans with a marble monument in the historic Duck Creek Cemetery.

The Civil War monument was dedicated in 1866 to honor the 221 residents who served in the conflict.

A dedication on the monument’s west face reads, “Erected to the memory of Wellfleet’s heroes by the Ladies Soldiers Aid Society, assisted by the subscribers to the war fund.”

The west face also features a decorative trophy displaying crossed cannons and muskets, the U.S. shield and a flag.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.The monument’s south face bears an inscription reading, “Bright hopes on freedom’s altar laid,” and honors three residents who died during their service by listing their names, ages, regimental affiliations, and dates and places of death.

The north face bears an inscription reading, “Died for our country in naval service,” and lists details about five residents who died during their service.

Among the five are John D. Langly, 49, who died while serving in New Orleans in July of 1862. His death came shortly after the death of his son, John N. Langly, 22, who died at Cairo, Illinois in May of 1862. The younger John Langly was the third of 10 children the older John Langly would have with Hannah A Baker.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.The monument is topped with a decorative funereal urn topped with a representation of an eternal flame.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Monument to the Forefathers, Plymouth, Mass.

Update: We’ve published Faith and Freedom: The National Monument to the Forefathers, a book describing this magnificent monument in more detail. Learn more.

 

With a recent movie creating interest in the National Monument to the Forefathers in Plymouth, Mass., we put together a quick video slideshow to highlight the monument.

Our original post, with detailed information about the monument, is here.

Finding the monument: The National Monument to the Forefathers is on Allerton Street, a residential neighborhood in Plymouth. If you’re using GPS or an online mapping service to find the site, using the address “70 Allerton Street” will bring you close enough to find on-street parking.

Plymouth, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brewster Cemetery, Brewster, Mass.

The maritime heritage of Brewster, Mass., is reflected in the number of sea captains, several  lost at sea, who are honored in Brewster Cemetery.

During a recent visit to the cemetery, on Lower Road, we found more than 13 graves bearing the names of local captains who were lost or died while abroad.

According to the 1906 book “Brewster Ship Masters” by J. Henry Sears, Brewster is believed to have supplied the most sea captains (as a percentage of population) of any town in the nation. By 1840, when the town’s population was about 1,000, more than 115 residents had captained a ship.

In 1850, at the height of Brewster’s maritime prosperity, more than 50 captains were living in town at the same time.

The following excerpt from the book demonstrates the importance of international trade to Brewster:

In the [18]40′s and 50′s the young man born in Brewster, who did not go to sea as soon as his schooling was complete was a shiftless no-account, unfit to associate with the aristocracy. His comrades shipped as cabin-boys, under Brewster captains of their fathers’ acquaintance and with Brewster mates and many Brewster members of the crew, studied navigation, and, at ages ranging from twenty-one to twenty-five, became captains themselves.

As the following excerpt illustrates, the dependence on the sea was hard on Brewster families, and often ended unhappily:

Women and children saw husbands and fathers only at long intervals and waited for news of their arrival in far-off ports. Sometimes they waited, and when the news came it was in the form of a letter from a mate or a steward and told of a death and burial at sea…Many a stone in the Brewster cemetery has “lost at sea” carven on it and the mystery of that loss will always be a mystery.

For example, Capt. Alfred F. Knowles was born in Brewster in 1839, and was lost along with the ship “Southern Eagle” after a typhoon struck during a voyage between Rangoon (the former capital of Myanmar, then known as Burma) and Liverpool in May of 1870.

Similarly, Capt. Nathan F. Foster was a Brewster native who was born in 1833. He was on the ship “Centaur” when it caught fire in August 1874 during a trip between Liverpool and San Francisco. The crew made it onto three boats, but Foster was never heard from.

The fact that many families multiple members at sea meant some experienced tragedy more than once. Capt. Theophilus Berry and his wife Sarah lost Theophilus, Jr. in 1817 at the age of 16 and Capt. Isaac F. Berry in 1829 at the age of 24.

According to the Sears book, the importance of the sea trade had passed by the end of the 19th Century and was gradually replaced by tourism as Brewster’s primary source of revenue. Instead of sailing to distant lands, Brewster’s youth has the safer choice of frying clam strips and scooping ice cream.

Many of the former captain’s homes remain along Main Street and, together with the headstones standing atop empty graves in Brewster Cemetery, help today’s tourists understand the town’s maritime past.

National Monument to the Forefathers, Plymouth, Mass.

Update: We’ve published Faith and Freedom: The National Monument to the Forefathers, a book describing this magnificent monument in more detail. Learn more.

 

A granite monument standing 81 feet tall honors the first English settlers to land in Plymouth, Mass.

The National Monument to the Forefathers stands in a state park on Allerton Street. If you look at the first picture in this post, the small people in the lower left will give you a good indication of the size of this massive and intricate monument.

The monument, the largest solid-granite monument in the United States, was dedicated in 1889 (30 years after its cornerstone was laid).

A dedication on the monument’s northeast face reads, “National Monument to the Forefathers. Erected by a grateful people in remembrance of their labors, sacrifices and sufferings for the cause of civil and religious liberty.”

The monument features several allegorical figures depicting virtues the Pilgrims, known in Plymouth as the Forefathers, brought with them when they arrived in Massachusetts in 1620.

The largest figure, Faith, is 36 feet tall and weighs 180 tons by itself. Faith, holding a Bible, stands atop a granite column facing toward Plymouth Harbor and England. (The osprey nest on Faith’s head is not part of the original design.)

The eight-sided column features four buttresses with seated 15-foot-tall allegorical figures. Moving counterclockwise from the monument’s front, the north face features a representation of Morality, a woman holding a tablet bearing the beginning of the Ten Commandments, “I am the Lord thy God.”

Niches in the base of Morality’s throne honor prophecy and evangelism.

The west face depicts Law, a man holding a book. Law is flanked by smaller figures depicting justice and mercy.

Education graces the south face with a woman pointing to a book in her lap. Representations of wisdom and youth flank Education’s throne.

The east face features a representation of Liberty, a seated warrior with a sword in his right arm and a broken chain in his left. He is flanked by depictions of peace and tyranny, symbolizing the defeat of tyranny and the resulting peace.

Along with the allegorical figures, the monument’s buttresses also feature bas-relief sculptures depicting scenes such as the Pilgrims departing England and landing on the shores of Plymouth and interacting with Native Americans.

The side of the monument’s face also bears panels listing the names of the Pilgrim settlers, and a quote from William Bradford, a governor of the colony.

The monument was designed primarily by Boston sculptor Hammatt Billings, who was also responsible for the Civil War monument in Concord, Mass. As large was the Forefathers monument stands, Billings’ original design called for it to be nearly twice as high at 150 feet (just under the Statue of Liberty’s height, including the pedestal, of 151 feet).

The monument’s height was reduced when funding became short during the Civil War.

The monument was commissioned by the Pilgrim Society, which maintained the monument and the small park surrounding it until the site was deeded to the commonwealth in 2001.

The Pilgrims are also honored with a monument in Provincetown, Mass., that was dedicated in 1910. The Pilgrims originally landed in Provincetown, but after five weeks, decided the far end of Cape Cod would be better suited for T-shirt shops and restaurants than for farming. The group then migrated west to the more-sheltered area that became Plymouth.