Veterans’ Monuments, Plymouth

The town of Plymouth honors veterans of recent wars with three monuments in a Main Street park.

The Plymouth Veterans’ Monument, near the intersection of Main Street (Route 6) and North Main Street, features a monument honoring the two World Wars and Korea, as well as a separate monument commemorating the Vietnam War.

The two World Wars and Korea are honored with an undated granite monument that features three bronze plaques listing local veterans. An eagle is inscribed on the central column, as is a dedication reading, “Dedicated in memory of the men and women of the town of Plymouth, Conn., who served their country in World War I, World War II [and the] Korean War.”

Beneath this dedication, a plaque lists the names of eight residents killed in World War I, 25 killed in World War II and two killed in Korea.

On the left and right sides of the monument, plaques list approximately 200 World War I veterans and about 700 residents who served in World War II.

To the immediate left of the Veteran’s Monument, a granite monument honors residents who served in the Vietnam War. Six residents who died in the conflict are honored above a list of an estimated 375 residents who served in the war.

A short walk northeast of the monument, a bronze plaque on a large boulder honors veterans of the two World Wars. The plaque, mounted on the boulder’s southeast face, reads, “Dedicated to the loyal sons and daughters of Plymouth, Connecticut, who served their country during World Wars I and II. Erected through the generosity of Judge Andrew W. Granniss 1953.”

The monuments are not far from the Civil War-era monuments in Terryville and about 2.5 miles west on the Plymouth Green.

Soldiers’ Monument, Terryville

Soldiers' Monument, TerryvilleAn obelisk in Terryville’s Hillside Cemetery honors the service of local residents killed in the Civil War.

The dedication date of the monument, in the Terryville section of Plymouth, was not recorded. But like its neighbor on the Plymouth green, its unadorned design indicates it was probably erected in 1865 or 1866.

Bronze tablets listing residents killed during the war were added in 1983 because the original inscriptions had faded and were difficult to read.

The monument does not have a formal dedication message, other than the word “Soldiers” on its front (southwest) face. The bronze plaque above this dedication lists the names, ages and dates of death of six residents who were lost in the war.

The southeast and northeast face of the monuments both honor six residents, and five people are honored on the northwest face of the monument.

Looking at the ages of the Civil War heroes from Terryville reminds us of the relative youth of the soldiers involved in the conflict (as well as those serving the nation today). Of the 23 people listed on the monument, 11 died in their twenties, and six were killed in their teens. Three men were killed in their thirties, and three more in their forties.

Soldiers' Monument, TerryvilleA number of veterans from the Civil War and later conflicts are buried in the section surrounding the monument. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Terryville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Terryville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Terryville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut

Soldiers’ Monument, Plymouth

Soldiers' Monument, PlymouthOne of the state’s oldest Civil War monuments stands on the green in Plymouth.

Although the dedication date of the monument was not recorded, local tradition and its appearance indicate it was completed shortly after the Civil War ended in 1865.

The monument is a tasteful obelisk, similar to the monuments in Northfield and North Branford that were both dedicated in 1866. The front (south) face bears the dedication “Erected to perpetuate the memory of those who lost their lives in the war of 1861” (this is an uncommon reference to the conflict, which is usually described as the “war to preserve the Union” or as the “war of the rebellion”).

As the Northfield obelisk does, the Plymouth monument also bears Lincoln’s name on its front face.

The south face of the Plymouth monument also bears eight names, including one who is honored for his service as a chaplain. The east, north and west faces each list the names of 10 residents who served in the war.

The corners of the obelisk are framed with carved cannons, a design element not seen in the Northfield or North Branford monuments. 

Soldiers' Monument, Plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

Connecticut Historical Society: Civil War Monuments of Connecticut