Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

Veterans’ Memorial Green, WestportWestport honors the veterans of the 20th Century Wars with a collection of monuments on a downtown green.

Veteran’s Memorial Green, between Main Street and Myrtle Avenue, includes monuments honoring the service of local residents in the two World wars, Korea and Vietnam.

The World War I monument features a bronze Doughboy atop a granite base. A bronze shield on the south face reads, “Dedicated to the citizens of Westport who served in the World War. Erected Nov. 11, 1930.”

Veterans’ Memorial Green, WestportPlaques on the west and east sides of the monument’s base list Westport residents who served in the conflict, with the west plaque honoring seven residents who were killed, and the east plaque honoring seven who served as nurses.

The Doughboy atop the monument was created by sculptor J. Clinton Shepherd, whose other works include a wide range of Western-themed sculptures.

The monument was located on Old Post Road until it was moved to the green in 1987.

Immediately next to the World War I monument, a monument honors the service of Westport’s World War II heroes. A plaque mounted on a rough boulder bears the dedication, “They honored us more than we can ever honor them,” and lists about 42 residents who died during World War II service.

The monument is flanked by smaller markers honoring Westport’s Korea and Vietnam war veterans. The Vietnam plaque lists five residents killed in the conflict.

To your left (as you face the monuments), an Honor Roll monument dedicated in 1998 recognizes  Westport’s World War II veterans. Five large plaques, each with three rows of names in small print, list local residents who served in the war.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans’ Memorial Green, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British Raid Monuments, Westport

British Raid Monument, WestportSeveral monuments on and near Westport’s Compo Beach mark the starting and ending point of the invasion of Danbury by British forces who landed there on April 25, 1777. 

The British brought about 2,000 troops to Westport, who planned to destroy war supplies being stored about 20 miles north in Danbury. The British spent the night in Weston before reaching Danbury on April 26, where they destroyed food, medicine and ammunition (but didn’t do a great job of destroying a cache of rum, which they drank instead). 

Warned of the pending arrival of local militia, the British evacuated Danbury and retreated south, engaging in battles in Ridgefield and Westport before sailing away on April 28. The British suffered more than 200 casualties in the fighting, and the Americans had 20 men killed and 40 wounded. 

Westport marks the battles with three monuments. At the intersection of Compo Road South and Post Road East, a boulder bears a plaque reading “Here occured the first engagement between the Continentals and the British Troops when they invaded Connecticut April-25-1777.” The plaque was dedicated in 1914 by the Connecticut Society Sons of the American Revolution. 

Minuteman Monument, WestportThe site, on a small traffic median, is also marked by a brown hanging sign bearing the Connecticut logo and the inscription “One mile south at Compo Beach, 2000 British Troops landed April 25, 1777, for raid on Danbury.”

A bit further down Compo Road, Westport’s Minuteman monument kneels atop a traffic circle at the intersection of Compo Road South and Compo Beach Road. The monument depicts a musket-wielding Continental soldier waiting with his sleeves rolled up for the returning Redcoats. 

A plaque on the north side of the base reads “To commemorate the heroism of the patriots who defended their country when the British invaded this state April 25th 1777. General David Wooster, Colonel Abraham Gould and more than one hundred Continentals fell in the engagements commencing at Danbury and closing on Compo Hill”  

Minuteman Monument, WestportThe monument, created by sculptor Harry Daniel Webster, was cast by Tiffany Studios in 1910. 

Continuing south to Compo Beach, a pair of large cannons have been mounted on a granite base to commemorate the fighting on and near the beach as the British returned to their ships. The cannons, whose markings can’t be distinguished, were donated by the U.S. government. The monument, dedicated in 1901, was restored in 1999. 

(On Friday, we’ll look at Danbury’s monument to the invasion and the nearby grave of Gen. David Wooster.) 

 

 

Minuteman Monument, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compo Beach cannons, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compo Beach cannons, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


9/11 Memorial, Westport

9/11 Memorial, WestportThe state of Connecticut’s monument honoring residents who were killed in the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, sits in a well-landscaped section of Sherwood Island State Park in Westport. 

The state’s 9/11 Living Memorial features a dark granite monument inscribed with a dedication on its northeast face reading “The citizens of Connecticut dedicate this living memorial to the thousands of innocent lives lost on September 11, 2001 and to the families who loved them.” 

The memorial is in the Sherwood Point section of the park, overlooking Long Island Sound on a small section of land extending beyond the park’s beaches.

9/11 Memorial, WestportThe northwest and southeast sections of the memorial are lined with two rows of granite markers bearing the names of 152 residents who died in the attacks. Visitors have placed sea shells, flowers and other mementos on many of the markers. 

Four benches stand to the northeast of the large granite monument, and the area around the memorial features gravel pathways and shrubbery to create a peaceful area for quiet reflection. 

Standing in front of the granite monument, viewers face southwest toward Manhattan and the former site of the World Trade Center. On a clear day, the Twin Towers were visible, and on Sept. 11, smoke from the fallen towers could be seen from the location of the memorial. 

 

9/11 Memorial, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/11 Memorial, Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/11 Memorial, Westport