Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, Massachusetts

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsA monument to Abraham Lincoln in Hingham, Mass., honors an ancestral connection between the president and the town.

Lincoln’s early relatives, including his great-great-great-great grandfather Samuel, were among the English settlers of Hingham.

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsThe Lincoln statue, on a green near Samuel Lincoln’s home on Lincoln Street, was dedicated in 1939. The south face of the monument’s base bears an inscription with the “With malice toward none, with charity for all” excerpt from Lincoln’s second inaugural address in 1865.

The north face bears a dedication to the family of Everett Whitney, a local lumber dealer who funded with statue with a $30,000 donation (more than $492,000 in today’s dollars) bequest.

Abraham Lincoln Statue, Hingham, MassachusettsThe sculpture was created by Charles Keck,  whose other works include a Harry S. Truman bust in the U.S. Capitol, the Father Francis P. Duffy statue in New York’s Time Square, the bronze USS Maine plaque that was mounted in nearly 1,000 locations and numerous other works.

A memorial near the north end of the green honors Benjamin Lincoln, another descendent of Hingham’s settlers. Benjamin Lincoln served as a major general during the American Revolution, and accepted the British surrender at Yorktown. He also served as the first secretary of war of the United States.

Samuel Lincoln Home, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Lincoln Memorial, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Lincoln Memorial, Hingham, Massachusetts

 

Roger Williams Monument, Providence

Roger Williams Monument, ProvidenceRhode island founder Roger Williams is honored with a monument in, fittingly enough, Providence’s Roger Williams Park.

The monument, dedicated in 1877, depicts a standing Williams holding a book inscribed with the words “soul” and “liberty”.

At the monument’s base, Clio (the muse of history) is inscribing Williams’ name and 1636, the year of Providence’s founding.

Roger Williams Monument, ProvidenceThe Clio figure originally held a metal quill in her right hand, and the monument once featured a bronze shield, scroll and wreath near Clio’s feet (the missing elements can be seen in the 1905 black-and-white image from the Library of Congress).

The land for Roger Williams Park, and funding for the statue, were donated to the city by Williams’ great-great-great granddaughter Betsy. The park site was part of Williams’ land grant from the Narragansett tribe and the location of the family farm.

Roger Williams Monument, ProvidenceThe monument was sculpted by Franklin Simmons, whose other works include the U.S. Grant memorial at the U.S. Capitol. Another version of the statue, without the Clio figure, is displayed in the Capitol building.

Not far from the Williams monument, a bronze bust and bench honor Richard H. Deming, a former president of the Providence park commission. The bust was dedicated in 1904.

Roger Williams Monument, Providence

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Williams Monument, Providence

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Williams Memorial, 1905

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Deming Memorial, Providence

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Deming Memorial, Providence

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Deming Memorial, Providence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Centennial Monument, Bridgeport

Centennial Monument, BridgeportBridgeport honors the 100th anniversary of its founding (and the U.S. bicentennial) with a granite memorial on a pre-colonial era militia ground.

The Centennial Monument, near the intersection of North Avenue (Route 1) and Brooklawn Avenue, stands at the southeast corner of the Clinton Park Militia Grounds.

Centennial Monument, BridgeportThe memorial bears a large centennial emblem featuring the City of Bridgeport seal, and the date of the city’s founding in 1836. The top of the monument features an engraved band depicting a school, factory and housing from then-modern Bridgeport.

The monument was dedicated in October of 1936 by longtime mayor Jasper McLevy.

Centennial Monument, BridgeportForty years later, a dedication including an inscription reading “Thank God for America” was added to commemorate the U.S. bicentennial.

In the northwest corner of the militia grounds, a 1901 memorial gate stands at the entrance of Stratfield Cemetery. Two granite markers on the gates list American Revolution veterans buried within the cemetery.

Centennial Monument, Bridgeport

 

 

 

 

 

Centennial Monument, Bridgeport

 

 

 

 

 

Centennial Monument, Bridgeport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

Wall of Honor, StaffordStafford honors veterans of the nation’s 20th century wars with monuments in a small park on West Main Street.

The Wall of Honor in Stafford’s Olympic Park, dedicated in 2005, features three granite memorials bearing bronze plaques as well as a large World War II cannon.

The central memorial lists the names of six Stafford residents who lost their lives while serving in World War I, as well as the names of 14 residents lost in World War II, and three who died while serving in Korea.

A sign in front of the memorial lists a resident who died while serving in Iraq.

Wall of Honor, StaffordThe central memorial is flanked by two larger granite monuments with bronze plaques listing residents who served in the nation’s wars during the 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall of Honor, Stafford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford Springs

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford SpringsStafford Springs honors business and political leader Charles Holt with a memorial fountain in a traffic near the intersection of Main Street (Route 190) and River Road (Route 32).

The granite fountain was dedicated in 1894 to honor Charles Holt, owner of the Phoenix Woolen Co. and president of the Stafford Savings Bank.

The fountain’s south side bears an inscription reading, “In Memory of Charles Holt,” and the north side lists the fountain’s dedication date.

Holt, a native of Willington, was superintendent of the Hydeville Manufacturing Co. mill and became its sole owner after it had become the Phoenix Woolen Co.

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford SpringsHolt, who died in 1892, also served in the Connecticut legislature in 1858.

The fountain was donated by Holt’s wife, Joanna, and his daughter Celia.

 

 

 

 

 

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford Springs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford Springs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford Springs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CTStafford Springs honors its Civil War veterans with a large cannon in Stafford Springs Cemetery on Monson Road (Route 32).

The cannon, dedicated in 1897, bears an inscription on its south (left) face reading, “A tribute to the patriotism of the men who went to the defence of the country from Stafford in the War of the Rebellion. The present bequeaths to the future the remembrance of the heroic past.”

The west face has an inscription reading, “Veterans 1861-1865.”

The north face bears an inscription reading, “Erected by Winter Post No. 44, G.A.R., assisted by the Woman Relief Corps, and the Sons of Veterans in honor of their comrades. Dedicated May 30, 1897.”

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CTThe north face of the monument’s base also highlights the donation of the surrounding veterans plot by Orrin Converse, a local attorney and officer of the Stafford Springs Savings Bank.

The cannon, a 32-pounder Rodman Gun, was cast in 1850.

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Cannon, Stafford Springs, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talking About Civil War Monuments in Hamden

American Soldier MonumentUPDATE: The talk went well. We had a good audience and people said nice things afterwards. I enjoyed the event, and the opportunity to share some information about one of my interests. Thanks for having me.

 

On Monday, March 11, I’ll have the distinct honor of addressing the Civil War Round Table of South Central Connecticut with a talk titled “Design Trends in Connecticut’s Civil War Monuments.”

The talk will review how the appearance of the state’s Civil War monuments evolved after the war’s end, some of the reasons the Civil War was the first U.S. conflict to receive public memorialization, and the contributions of the state’s leading monument designers and dealers.

We’ll also have copies of our book, Civil War Monuments of Connecticut, in case you’ve worn your copy out, or need another copy as a gift.

The fun kicks off at 7:30 at the Miller Memorial Central Library, 2901 Dixwell Ave., Hamden, CT.

Driving directions:


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Gettysburg Cyclorama Demolition Underway

Cyclorama Demolition UnderwayA friend in Gettysburg passed along this photo of the former Cyclorama building as demolition began on Friday. While the demolition is understandable – the building, which should not have been built 50-odd years ago on an historically significant part of the battlefield, leaked like a colander and had long outlived its usefulness – it’s still sad to see it coming down.

We have a lot of good family memories associated with the old Cyclo:

01. My first visit to Gettysburg in 1989

02. Jen moving to Gettysburg and, among other jobs in town, running the Cyclorama show.

03. Discovering how to sneak past the ticket counter (via the observation deck and straight into the upper lobby).

04. Jen meeting Ed.

05. Chris getting help for a bloody knee after tripping over a Hancock Avenue drainage ditch.

Good times.

 

Native American Fort Sites, Derby

New Indian Fort, DerbyDerby honors the location of two Native American forts with inscribed boulders.

The site of the “New Fort” is marked on the southwest side of Roosevelt Drive (Route 34,) near the section with Lakeview Terrace and across the street from the Osbornedale State Park garage.

An inscription on the boulder’s northeast face reads, “The new fort. Prior to 1654, the Paugasuck (Paugasset) Indians built their second fort near this spot.”

The boulder’s southwest face bears an inscription reading, “Erected by Sarah Riggs Humprey chapter, D.A.R, 1916.”

A boulder marking the site of the natives’ first fort stands in a small traffic island near the intersection of Seymour Avenue and Division Street. The boulder’s northwest face bears an inscription reading, “Great Neck. In this locality stood the old Indian fort prior to 1654.”

New Indian Fort, DerbyDerby was settled as a trading post in 1654, and was named for Derby, England, in 1675.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Indian Fort, Derby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Indian Fort, Derby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Indian Fort site, Derby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Indian Fort site, Derby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.Hinsdale, Massachusetts, honors its war veterans with a memorial outside the town’s library.

The monument, near the intersection of South Street (Route 8) and Maple Street (Route 143), was dedicated in 1923 and features a Civil War cannon.

A dedication plaque on the northeast face of the monument’s base reads, “This memorial was erected by the Town of Hinsdale and dedicated May 30, 1923. The Civil War tablet and the cannon and balls used in the Civil War, are the gift of Francis E. Warren, soldier and statesman, United States Senator from Wyoming, a native of Hinsdale, award [the] Medal of Honor as follows; ‘Volunteered in response to a call and took part in the movement that was made upon the enemy’s work under a heavy fire therefrom in advance of the general assault.’”

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.A plaque on the southwest face lists Hinsdale’s World War II veterans in four columns.

A plaque on the northwest face honors veterans of the American Revolution, Spanish-American War, World War I, and fighting along the Mexican border in 1916.

A plaque on the southeast face honors Hinsdale’s Civil War veterans.

The cannon was used in the siege and battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana. Warren, who also served as governor of Wyoming, was honored for his actions during that battle and donated the cannon to Hinsdale. A U.S. Air Force missile base in Wyoming is named after Warren.

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.The cannon’s carriage was replaced during a restoration of the monument in 2006.

Thanks to Mom and Dad for the images in this post. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorial, Hinsdale, Mass.