Antietam’s 150th Anniversary

150 years ago, members of four Connecticut regiments, many of them in their first Civil War fighting, were among the 23,000 who lost their lives during the Battle of Antietam. Today, we visit the CTMonuments.net archives to honor the state residents who fought in these Maryland cornfields and helped turn the tide toward reuniting the United States.

General Mansfield Monument, Antietam

 General Mansfield Monuments

Connecticut native and Civil War General Joseph K.F. Mansfield is honored with two monuments near the site of his mortal wounding on the Antietam battlefield.

 

 

 

 

CT 14th Regiment Monument, Sharpsburg, Md.

14th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

A granite obelisk honoring the 14th CT Regiment stands a short distance from the sunken farm road at Antietam that became known as Bloody Lane.

 

 

 

 

CT 11th Regiment Monument, Antietam

11th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

During the Battle of Antietam, the 11th Regiment was involved in fierce fighting near Burnside Bridge.

 

 

 

 

CT 8th Regiment Monument, Antietam

8th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

The 8th Regiment has a monument at Antietam on private property along Harpers Ferry Road, just outside the boundaries of the battlefield park.

 

 

 

 

CT 16th Regiment Monument, Antietam16th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

The 16th regiment’s service is honored with a multi-colored granite obelisk, dedicated in 1894, on the western edge of the 40-Acre Cornfield off Antietam’s Branch Avenue.

 

 

 

 

Antietam National Cemetery, Sharpsburg, MD

Antietam National Cemetery

The Antietam National Cemetery is the final resting place of nearly 4,800 Union Civil War veterans as well as more than 200 veterans of other wars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Centerville, Mass.

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.One of the oldest Civil War monuments in Massachusetts stands on a small green in the Centerville section of Barnstable.

The Soldiers’ Monument in Centerville, a granite obelisk dedicated in July of 1866, stands near the intersection of Main Street and Park Avenue, and is one of several veterans’ memorials on the green.

The Civil War monument’s front (north) face lists eight names of of local residents who died during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 47.

The north face also bears a shield bearing the monument’s 1866 dedication date.

The west face bears seven names of Civil War heroes ranging in age from 17 to 45, as well as a decorative trophy featuring crossed swords and an inscription reading, “They died for their country.”

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.The south face bears nine names, ranging in age from 18 to 51, and a shield with an inscription reading, “Erected by the Town of Barnstable.”

The east face lists eight names, ranging from age 16 to 27.

To the north of the Civil War monument, Centerville’s two dozen World War I veterans are honored with a bronze plaque on a boulder that was dedicated in 1927.

Near the southern end of the green, contemporary monuments honor Centerville’s veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korean War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers' Monument, Centerville, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. Brewster, Massachusetts, honors its local war veterans and heroes with a collection of monuments on Main Street.

The war memorials stand in front of the town’s Council on Aging, a Victorian building on Main Street (Route 6A) that was built in 1893 as Town Hall.

The westernmost of the monuments (on your left as you face the memorials) honors Brewster’s World War I veterans. The monument features a plaque on its south face reading, “Memorial to those who served in the World War. Presented to the Town of Brewster by the Brewster Grange 1919.”

The monument lists the names of 43 residents who served in the conflict, and highlights three who died during their wartime service. Among the dead is Roland C. Nickerson, a member of the prominent Brewster family whose land provided the basis for Roland C. Nickerson State Park.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. To the right of the World War I monument, a bronze plaque on a boulder honors Brewster’s World War II veterans. The monument’s dedication reads, “Proudly we pay tribute to the men and women of Brewster who answered their country’s call in World War II.”

The monument also bears the names of about 120 residents, and honors four who died during the war.

Next to the World War II monument, a smaller memorial honors Brewster residents who fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

To the right of the World War II monument, a memorial honors Brewster’s veterans of the Korea and Vietnam wars. The plaque lists 57 veterans.

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass. At the far right of the memorial collection, a monument honors “veterans from Brewster who served in foreign campaigns.” The memorial doesn’t list any names, but will likely do so in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Brewster, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.Chatham, Massachusetts, honors its Civil War heroes with a marble monument on a Main Street green.

The marble obelisk, on a green near the triangular intersection of Main and Seaview streets, bears a dedication on its southwest face reading, “Erected by the town of Chatham in memory of those that fell in the Rebellion of 1861 to 1865.”

The southwest face also bears a decorative trophy depicting crossed rifles and flags.

The southeast face lists the name, affiliation, ages and details about the wounding and death of six local veterans who perished during their Civil War service. The men ranged in age from 19 to 36, and the listing for Benjamin F. Bassett appears to have a correction for his age (an uncommon occurrence for a marble war monument).

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.The northwest face lists seven names of war heroes who ranged in age from 18 to 56.

The monument has been attributed to sculptor James H. Jenks.

The monument is not dated, but its similarity to other monuments from the late 1860s (including the 1865 Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Wellfleet) would suggest the Chatham monument was dedicated during that general period.

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Monument, Chatham, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.Wellfleet, Massachusetts, honors its Civil War veterans with a marble monument in the historic Duck Creek Cemetery.

The Civil War monument was dedicated in 1866 to honor the 221 residents who served in the conflict.

A dedication on the monument’s west face reads, “Erected to the memory of Wellfleet’s heroes by the Ladies Soldiers Aid Society, assisted by the subscribers to the war fund.”

The west face also features a decorative trophy displaying crossed cannons and muskets, the U.S. shield and a flag.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.The monument’s south face bears an inscription reading, “Bright hopes on freedom’s altar laid,” and honors three residents who died during their service by listing their names, ages, regimental affiliations, and dates and places of death.

The north face bears an inscription reading, “Died for our country in naval service,” and lists details about five residents who died during their service.

Among the five are John D. Langly, 49, who died while serving in New Orleans in July of 1862. His death came shortly after the death of his son, John N. Langly, 22, who died at Cairo, Illinois in May of 1862. The younger John Langly was the third of 10 children the older John Langly would have with Hannah A Baker.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.The monument is topped with a decorative funereal urn topped with a representation of an eternal flame.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Wellfleet, Mass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

Budleski Memorial Park, YalesvilleThe Yalesville section of Wallingford honors a World War II hero and its World War I veterans with memorials on the village green.

Budleski Memorial Park, at the intersection of Main (CT Route 150) and Chapel streets, was dedicated on May 28, 1944, to honor a local airplane mechanic killed over Germany in 1943.

A plaque at the western end of the green reads, “Budleski Memorial Park. In honor of Stanley P. Budleski, 1st Lt. AAF (Army Air Force), who died in action December 20, 1943. Erected by Yalesville Mens Club, November 11th, 1949.

According to the Connecticut Historical Society, Lt. Budleski enlisted in 1942, and was reported missing in 1943. His death was confirmed the following year.

Budleski Memorial Park, YalesvilleOne of two children of Polish immigrants, Lt. Budleski grew up on his family’s farm a short distance west of the green on Main Street.

He was honored with a parade on the day the green was named in his memory.

A few steps west of the Lt. Budleski marker, a monument honors Yalesville’s World War I veterans.

The monument bears a dedication reading, “In recognition of those who served in the World War, 1914-1919, from the Village of Yalesville.”

The monument, dedicated in 1939 by the Yalesville Mens Club, lists the names of 27 local World War I veterans.

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budleski Memorial Park, Yalesville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument Rededicated in New Haven

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument RededicationOn Sunday afternoon, the 1887 Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument in New Haven’s East Rock Park was rededicated in a ceremony that took place on the monument’s 125th anniversary.

The rededication was organized by the Connecticut 9th Irish Regiment, the Irish History Round Table and the Connecticut Irish American Historical Society.

An honor guard from several reenactment organizations laid a wreath at the monument’s base, and State Troubadour Emeritus Tom Callinan entertained the crowd with Civil War songs.

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument was dedicated in 1887 to honor soldiers and sailors who fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War and the Civil War.

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument RededicationAn estimated 100,000 people attended the monument’s original dedication. Although Sunday’s crowd was a little smaller, the event provided a fitting tribute to the monument and the New Haven veterans it honors.

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East Rock Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Rededication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constitution Convention Oak, Torrington

Constitution Convention Oak, TorringtonA plaque on Torrington’s Main Street marks the location of a pin oak tree planted in 1902 to honor the convention that considered revisions to Connecticut’s state constitution.

Torrington’s Consitition Oak stands across Main Street from the Hotchkiss-Fyler House, which now serves as a Museum and the headquarters for Torrington’s historical society.

The plaque at the foot of the 1902 oak (the larger tree near the center of the first image) provides a history of the oak donation program.

Delegates to the constitution convention were sent by all 168 Connecticut municipalities at the time, and each delegate was presented with a pin oak seedling by Charles Hawley, one of the state’s U.S. Senators.

Constitution Convention Oak marker, TorringtonThe proposed constitutional amendments were defeated by voters.

Torrington’s delegate was Orsamus R. Fyler, a Civil War veteran who also served as Torrington’s postmaster, state insurance commissioner, Republican state chairman and a member of state railroad commission.

According to a 2002 survey of the pin oaks conducted by the Connecticut’s Notable Trees Program and the Connecticut College Arboretum, about 75 of the trees have died over the years, and the locations of 21 were not recorded.

 

 

 

Hotchkiss-Fyler House, Torrington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War Memorials, Cornwall

War Memorials, CornwallThe Cornwall green features monuments honoring the town’s war veterans and a 1989 tornado.

Two granite monuments at the eastern edge of the green, near the corner of Pine Street and Bolton Hill Road, honor veterans of the nation’s 20th Century wars.

The southern monument features bronze Honor Roll plaques listing Cornwall’s World War veterans. The World War I plaque lists about 38 names.

The World War II Honor Roll lists about 110 names, and highlights seven Cornwall residents who died during their World War II service.

War Memorials, CornwallNext to the World Wars memorial, a monument honors Cornwall’s veterans of Korea and Vietnam. The Korea plaque lists about 35 local veterans, and the Vietnam plaque lists about 50 names.

A few steps south of the war memorials, a plaque under a large oak tree proclaims the tree to be a descendent of Hartford’s Charter Oak.

At the western edge of the green, a memorial plaque near a young tree honors “the people and the community spirit that helped Cornwall recover from the July 10, 1989 tornado.” The plaque also lists civic leaders in 1989.

The tornado, one of several to strike Connecticut that day, largely destroyed the old-growth Cathedral Pines forest in Cornwall.

A marker in front of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, near the western edge of the green, designates the location of the Foreign Mission School, which attempted to educate Native American and international missionary students between 1819 and 1826.

World War I Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Honor Roll, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korea and Vietnam Honor Rolls, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Marker, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter Oak Scion, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree, Cornwall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tornado Commemoration Tree Marker, Cornwall