Memorial Boulevard, Bristol (Part 2)

Civil War Monument, Memorial Boulevard, BristolToday we continue our look at the monuments along Bristol’s Memorial Boulevard.

The newest Memorial Boulevard monument was dedicated in 2011 to honor Bristol’s Civil War veterans. Bristol dedicated a brownstone Civil War monument in 1866 in the city’s West Cemetery (one of the earliest in the state), and added a the Memorial Boulevard monument this year because the 54 names on the original monument have become difficult to read with the passage of time.

The 2011 pink granite monument, next to the city’s monument honoring its World War II and Korea heroes, features a large engraved eagle and crossed cannons. A bronze plaque on the monument’s north face lists Bristol residents lost in the Civil War, and describes the history of the West Cemetery memorial.

Civil War Monument, Memorial Boulevard, BristolThe base of the monument honors the battles of Fredericksburg, Antietam and Plymouth.

The north side of Memorial Boulevard also includes a monument dedicated to residents who fought during Operation Desert Storm. A boulder has a plaque on its south face with an August 7, 1994 dedication date. The plaque recognizes “the men and women from Bristol and Forestville (a section of Bristol) who served their country with pride during the Persian Gulf War, Operation Desert Storm.”

Not far from the Desert Storm memorial, a monument honors Bristol residents who have served in the Connecticut militia and National Guard. The granite monument is topped with a plaque reading, “in honor of Bristol citizen soldiers who, through service with militia units in the National Guard, have defended and preserved our community, state and nation in our wars and emergencies since Colonial times.”

Near the western end of Memorial Boulevard, a monument honors Bristol’s veterans. A plaque mounted on a granite boulder reads, “in honor and tribute for all veterans past, present and future. Let us visit here for gratitude and remembrance.”

Civil War Monument, Memorial Boulevard, BristolNear the veterans memorial, a copy of the Hiker statue honors Bristol’s World War II heroes. Bristol’s original Hiker statue was dedicated in 1929 to honor the city’s Spanish-American War veterans, and the Memorial Boulevard version was dedicated in 1983.

Bristol’s Memorial Boulevard was dedicated in 1921 to honor the city’s World War I veterans. Over the years, the collection of monuments has grown to honor the service of Bristol’s veterans as well as the sacrifice of its war heroes.

Bristol industrialist Albert F. Rockwell donated land in 1919 for Memorial Boulevard and a nearby high school that is used today as a middle school. Rockwell owned successful ventures in coaster brakes for bicycles, automotive ball bearings and, during World War I, Marlin-Rockwell machine guns.

Desert Storm Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desert Storm Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Militia and National Guard Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Militia and National Guard Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans' Memorial, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Boulevard, Bristol (Part 1)

World War I Monument, BristolBristol honors its war heroes and veterans with a collection of monuments along a tree-lined avenue and park.

Bristol’s Memorial Boulevard was dedicated in 1921 to honor the city’s World War I veterans. Over the years, the collection of monuments has grown to honor the service of Bristol’s veterans as well as the sacrifice of its war heroes.

Bristol’s World War I veterans are honored with a granite column dedicated in 1924. The monument bears a dedication on its west face reading, “The city of Bristol, to honor its residents who served in the World War, here records their names.”

World War I Monument, BristolThe monument also lists the names of 48 residents killed in the war, and 10 bronze plaques mounted along the monument’s star-shaped base list the names of nearly 1,300 residents who served in the conflict.

Bristol’s World War I heroes were further honored by the planting of 50 oak trees along Memorial Boulevard.

In 1996, a marker was installed at the base of a flagpole near the World War I monument to honor six additional residents killed in the war, but whose names weren’t recorded on the 1924 memorial.

A 1906 German howitzer cannon that was captured by U.S. forces during the war stands near the World War I monument. The cannon, donated to Bristol in 1926, was originally placed in a median in front of the World War memorial, but was moved after being struck at least three times by motorists.

World War I Monument, BristolTo the east of the World War I memorial, a monument honors Bristol residents lost in World War II and Korea. A dedication on the monument’s north face reads, “To remember and to honor those from Bristol who served God and their country during World War II and Korea.” The monument’s north face also features an elaborate carved eagle.

Bronze plaques on the monument honor 143 residents killed in World War II and 13 residents who died while serving during the Korean War.

Bristol’s Korean War veterans are also honored with a 1995 black granite monument further east on Memorial Boulevard. The monument’s north face features an engraved map of Korea and a dedication to those who died, who are still missing, and those who returned.

World War I Cannon, BristolThe base of the monument bears a plaque listing 16 residents who died while serving during the Korean War.

Residents who were killed in Vietnam are honored with a monument to the west of the Korean War memorial. The 1973 monument bears a dedication on its north face reading, “In memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice.”

The south face of the monument lists 17 residents who died in Vietnam.

Bristol’s Vietnam veterans are also honored with a memorial walkway, dedicated in 2001, and monument commemorating the 1998 display of the Vietnam Traveling Wall along Memorial Boulevard. The walkway honors veterans from the American Revolution through the Vietnam era.

World War II and Korea Monument, BristolIn Part 2, we’ll look at other monuments along Memorial Boulevard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Korean War Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Monument, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Traveling Wall Memorial, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Memorial Walkway, Bristol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldiers’ Monument, Bristol

Bristol honors its Civil War veterans with an 1866 brownstone obelisk that’s one of the state’s earliest monuments commemorating the conflict.

The monument, on a hilltop in the city’s West Cemetery, was dedicated in January of 1866, making it perhaps the second Civil War monument in Connecticut.

(The 1863 monument in Kensington is believed to be the first in the nation, and the undated Civil War monument in Plymouth may have been dedicated in 1865 or 1866. The Bristol Soldiers’ Monument was one of five dedicated in 1866, along with monuments in Norwich, Cheshire, Northfield, Hartford and North Branford.)

The Bristol monument is a tall obelisk topped by a brownstone eagle. A dedication at the base of the monument’s front (east) side reads, “Erected by voluntary contributions in grateful remembrance of the volunteer soldiers of Bristol who gave up their lives in behalf of their country in the war of the great rebellion. The sacrifice was not in vain.”

The east face also lists 14 Bristol residents killed in the Civil War. The east face also features the seals of Connecticut and the United States, and a decorative trophy depicting a flag, a rifle, a sword and a cartridge pouch. The east face also honors the battle of Antietam and men who died at the Confederate prisoner of war camp in Andersonville, Ga.

The monument’s north face lists the names of 13 residents who died as prisoners of war, and two who were lost at sea. The battles of Fredericksburg (Va.) and Plymouth (N.C.) are also listed.

The west face lists 13 names, and the battles of Fort Wagner (S.C.) and Irish Bend (La.). The south face lists 12 names, and the battles of Gettysburg and New Bern (N.C.).

The monument was supplied by Hartford entrepreneur James Batterson, whose firm was responsible for a number of Civil War monuments in Connecticut and other locations.

Overall, the Bristol monument is good condition considering its age. The lettering on the base of the monument’s east face is somewhat weathered and difficult to read, and cracks on the south face appear to have been patched with a material similar to auto-repair putty. Two braces have been affixed to the top of the column, just below the brownstone eagle.

A low brownstone marker in front of the monument is dedicated “To the Unknown Dead,” and a marker honoring all veterans has been placed to the west of the monument.

A number of Civil War veterans are buried in the section just east of the Soldiers’ Monument.